Laneway Housing

March 14, 2016, 1pm PDT
Writer Alex Marshall looks to Kitsilano, a Vancouver neighborhood, for urban infill done right. Skyscrapers and mid-rise developments aren't always necessary to achieve more people per square foot.
Governing
December 14, 2015, 1pm PST
Leading other expensive cities in North America, Vancouver, British Columbia is quickly adding accessory dwelling units as a result of permissive regulations approved in 2009.
Citiscope
May 15, 2013, 7am PDT
Vancouver's efforts to facilitate accessory dwellings has proven to be popular - perhaps too popular for some residents. As officials prepare to expand the program citywide, they're tweaking it to address concerns with privacy and parking.
The Vancouver Sun
December 28, 2012, 5am PST
A decade ago, a landmark study proposed alley-side infill development, or laneway housing, as a way to provide Toronto with thousands of affordable units. Despite significant obstacles, some developers and architects remain committed to the idea.
The Toronto Star
September 8, 2011, 1pm PDT
The Canadians call it "laneway housing", and in the U.S. they're often dubbed "granny units". These smaller homes in underused garage or alley locations are creating new ways to add density to areas without changing community character.
SightlineDaily
December 6, 2010, 7am PST
The small town of Tofino, British Columbia is looking to the Vancouver model of "micro homes" and laneway housing to increase its stock of affordable housing.
Westerly
November 1, 2010, 6am PDT
Vancouver's liberalized laneway housing zoning is seen as a cost-effective and easy way to densify, make housing more affordable and reduce the city's carbon footprint. But not everyone is on board.
The Globe and Mail
June 24, 2010, 9am PDT
The idea was for the homes to be 'mortgage helpers' or cheaper way to house elderly parents. Since the citywide policy was passed last year, 89 laneways have been approved and some are already generating complaints.
The Globe and Mail
February 26, 2009, 1pm PST
A local TV host will be one of the first to take advantage of Vancouver's new 'laneway housing' pilot project (allowing 'granny units' in backyards of traditional city neighborhoods). The project is facing some controversy.
The Vancouver Courier