Fare-Free Transit

Mass demonstrations in Brazil over the past week were sparked by increases to bus fares. But what if buses were free? The Economist makes the argument that, to improve service and decrease congestion, we should study making buses and subways free.
Jun 21, 2013   The Economist
In January of this year, Tallinn (pop. 423,000) became the first European capital and the largest European city to provide public transit free of charge to its residents. So far, the experiment has proven a success.
Feb 19, 2013   Euro Cities
Jean-Francois Mayet, the mayor of Châteauroux, introduced free ridership in a bid to turn around his town's failing transit system. Eleven years later, total ridership has increased 208 percent. Henry Grabar examines whether free transit is scalable.
Oct 31, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
Despite the downward trend in public services like transit, the city of Baltimore in opening a free transit line.
Jan 19, 2010   Wired
The largest free mass transit area in the U.S. is changing its rules next year, when it will start charging people to ride the bus.
Aug 14, 2009   The Oregonian
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg recently announced an idea to speed up buses in Manhattan by eliminating crosstown bus fares.
Aug 5, 2009   The New York Times
Charles Komanoff, an economist, analyst and activist in New York, has created an elaborate spreadsheet looking at the cost of congestion to the city. His conclusion? Free transit and congestion pricing would relieve traffic.
Jul 7, 2009   Reuters Blogs
Transit agencies spend a lot of money to make money. In many cases, the amount spent equals or even surpasses the amount they bring in from fares. So why charge them at all? Dave Olsen takes a look at Fare-Free transit, what's holding it back, and how to make it a reality. Exclusive
Feb 23, 2009  By Dave Olsen