LOS

December 21, 2015, 9am PST
Determining whether to widen a street solely based on rush hour traffic ignores how the street is used and who uses it the rest of the day.
Streets.MN
August 10, 2014, 11am PDT
California planning expert Bill Fulton discusses a long-awaited proposal from the Governor's Office of Planning and Research that would shift the state's traffic impact assessments away from their current focus on traffic congestion.
California Planning and Development Report
July 9, 2014, 2pm PDT
A long read by Eric Jaffe serves as a primer on the "Level of Service" (LOS) requirement in the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), as well as predicting the large impact of LOS reform on planning in the state and around the country.
CityLab
January 10, 2014, 9am PST
California's Office of Planning & Research has been tasked with moving environmental analysis away from standards based solely on level of service. The agency has released its preliminary evaluation of alternative methods of transportation analysis.
California Planning & Development Report
December 18, 2012, 1pm PST
In his latest entry in KCET's "Laws That Shaped LA" Series, Jeremy Rosenberg looks at the impact that the Functional Classification system has had on the urban form of Los Angeles and cities throughout the country since its adoption in 1973.
KCET Departures
Blog post
March 28, 2009, 6pm PDT

Let me start with a disclaimer: I am not a transportation planner. At the points where transportation planning shares borders with engineering, I tend to zone out and start doodling in the margins. I do, however, have a lifelong interest in transportation, which is why I share the excitement of some of my more transportation-focused colleagues about potential changes in how California measures transportation impacts of projects.

Lisa Feldstein
January 27, 2009, 11am PST
"Level of service" is a ranking used by transportation engineers to assess the performance of roads. Streetsblog argues that LOS distorts the development of mobility infrastructure by prioritizing cars over people.
StreetsBlog-SF