Video Games

Not heard of Minecraft yet? Than you must not have a 10-year-old child in your house. Luckily, Sarah Goodyear does, and for our benefit, she describes the popular children's video game that explores real-world urban planning ideas.
Sep 19, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
The new edition of the Grand Theft Auto series will parody LA, including its idiosyncratic planning landscape, which will feature avaricious developers, activist NIMBYs, and a oceanside dwelling starchitect.
Nov 4, 2011   Curbed LA
Apparently in the horror first-person shooter videogame F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin for XBox, you can win a special "City Planner" achievement by -- blowing stuff up.
Feb 4, 2011   YouTube
Beatville is a new "open source, multi-player environment for real cities", which purports to be a useful tool for democratizing urban planning. Does it live up to the hype? Urban Omnibus checks it out.
Jan 28, 2011   Urban Omnibus
A website called "Isle of Tune" lets you build streets SimCity-style, with a twist- the houses and streetlights become musical elements in the sequence that you make.
Dec 20, 2010   TechCrunch
A new video game has been released that has players trying to solve urban issues and make cities work better. <em>Next American City</em> columnist Christian Madera reviews.
Oct 12, 2010   Next American City
Today IBM is releasing a new video game called CityOne that reportedly is like SimCity but with more serious environmental and economic issues at stake. And yes, the gamer plays the role of a city planner.
May 4, 2010   Fast Company
Using a real city as the setting for a video game can be kinda touchy -- especially if it's a less-than-complimentary reimagining of the city as a zombie wasteland. Post-Katrina New Orleans gets the dystopian video game treatment.
Dec 8, 2009   Good
The military has recently opened a new type of recruitment office known as "The Army Experience Center" in a Philadelphia shopping mall. It's like an arcade, where video games and other interactive technologies provide visitors a glimpse of what it might be like to be in the military. It's a new approach, one that capitalizes on the modern teenager's affection for video games to attract them to the military life. You could call it persuasive, cajoling, or even a thinly-veiled attempt to con kids with flashy games, but, as it provides exactly what its target audience wants, the bottom line is that it's very effective. Why couldn't a city do the same thing? Opinion
Jan 24, 2009   By Nate Berg