Water Pollution

NPR host Linda Wertheimer interviews Evan Osnos about his current New Yorker piece on the Jan. chemical spill into W. Va.'s Elk River. His focus is less on the spill and more on the influence of Big Coal in government and how it contributed to it.
Apr 4, 2014   NPR Morning Edition
The largest ever fine for polluting waterways, $27.5 million plus $200 million in clean-up costs was assigned to a coal company. NewsHour co-anchor Gwen Ifill interviews Dina Cappiello of The Associated Press to discuss water pollution from coal.
Mar 8, 2014   PBS NewsHour
The Feb. 2 spill of coal ash slurry from a Duke Energy containment pond has taken a new turn with a federal grand jury issuing subpoenas for records from both Duke Energy and the state environmental regulator.
Feb 17, 2014   The Charlotte Observer
Still reeling from a major chemical spill on Jan. 9 that contaminated the drinking water supply for 300,000 residents, word comes of a significant coal slurry spill. Unlike the earlier spill, the water supply is said not to be threatened.
Feb 13, 2014   The Charleston Gazette
The coal ash spill, 82,000 tons as of Feb. 8 after being detected on Feb. 2, comes from a pond adjacent to a closed, coal-burning Duke Energy power plant. It is said not to pose a threat to drinking water, though the river has turned black and grey.
Feb 8, 2014   The Wall Street Journal - U.S.
After the U.S. Supreme Court sent a long-running lawsuit over pollution in the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers back to a lower court, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that L.A. County is liable for high pollution levels in the rivers.
Aug 9, 2013   Los Angeles Times
In its enduring quest to slake its immense thirst, and protect its beautiful beaches, Los Angeles leaders are putting forth an ambitious proposal to solve two problems with one solution: make runoff drinkable.
Apr 9, 2013   The New York Times
A new study conducted by the EPA shows that 55 percent of the nation's rivers are in "poor" condition, and only 21 percent are rated as "good" and "healthy biological communities." Farm and industrial pollution are to blame.
Mar 28, 2013   The Atlantic Wire
Part of a larger strategy to address its numerous environmental ills, the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases will begin taxing carbon emissions, possibly as early as 2015.
Feb 21, 2013   Quartz
A local marina owner's plan to build a floating marsh in Baltimore's Inner Harbor to help clean up the city's main tourist attraction is being viewed skeptically by officials, who have raised a number of questions and concerns.
Oct 16, 2012   The Baltimore Sun
Cities across America have been revitalizing their waterfronts for decades with new parks and development replacing heavy industry. But, a new breed of advocates is going one step further, and pushing for a time when people can just jump right in.
Sep 17, 2012   Salon