Transportation Costs

June 8, 2016, 2pm PDT
Compared with European averages, U.S. and Canadian residents spend 30-50 percent more money and time on transport due to dispersed, automobile-dependent development.
City Observatory
March 16, 2016, 8am PDT
Writing for New Geography, Fannis Grammenos expresses skepticism that more compact cities are more affordable cities. In fact, Grammenos argues that just the opposite is true.
New Geography
March 4, 2016, 6am PST
Put another way, Shoup's case against parking requirements is that they make life harder for the poor.
The Washington Post
May 7, 2015, 1pm PDT
Certain intersections stand to gain from losing their traffic lights. According to this study, cities can save money and improve safety by uninstalling signals in low-traffic zones.
Blog post
February 25, 2013, 3am PST
Transportation system users rate inaffordability as a top concern, but conventional planning ignores this issue. Increasing transport affordability requires changing planning practices to favor more affordable modes and more accessible development.
Todd Litman
May 22, 2012, 5am PDT
A new study released on Friday, coinciding with National Bike to Work Day, finds that bicyclists in the United States save at least $4.6 billion a year by riding instead of driving, reports Tanya Mohn.
February 7, 2012, 2pm PST
Sarah Laskow reports on a new study by the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT) that seeks to rethink how affordable housing is defined to incorporate transportation costs.
December 5, 2011, 5am PST
David Levinson poses some possible answers, such as inaccurate project scopes, insufficient economies of scale, and an increase in safety standards.
The Transportationist
October 5, 2010, 12pm PDT
HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan talks with PBS about the department's new approach of integrating transportation and housing policy.
September 14, 2010, 6am PDT
A new website created by the Center for Neighborhood Technology calculates how much an average household in your neighborhood would spend on transportation, with results for cars and public transit.
Governing Magazine
September 3, 2010, 7am PDT
Philip Langdon argues that if the U.S. is going to shift toward compact, less resource-consuming patterns of development, Americans will have to rely increasingly on mass transit - so it better work.
New Urban Network
August 21, 2009, 9am PDT
A Freakonomics blogger has trouble finding an affordable bike in Portland, and looks into the reasons why.
The New York Times: Freakonomics Blog
Blog post
March 23, 2009, 12pm PDT

In a recent blog I emphasized the value of using smart growth policies to increase household affordability and support regional economic development. In his blog, “Planning Foreclosures,” Samuel Staley reaches a very different conclusion.

Todd Litman
February 17, 2009, 8am PST
A new report warns that an aging Canadian population will drive up infrastructure costs in public transit, water management, and roads and sidewalks.
Blog post
September 15, 2008, 2pm PDT

I often hear debates over the costs of different modes of transportation, particularly between driving and public transit travel. Rising fuel prices have made public transit more attractive for some trips, boosting ridership, but critics point out that for most trips, transit fares are still comparable with fuel costs (for example, at $4 a gallon, fuel costs about $2 for a typical 10-mile trip, comparable to a bus fare in a typical city), and generally take longer. It is therefore legitimate to ask whether public transit really saves money.

Todd Litman
July 25, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>Moscow tops an annual ranking of the world's most expensive cities. The survey examines housing, transportation, food, clothing, household goods and entertainment for corporations and government agencies determining living costs for expats.</p>
June 13, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>Riders of the New York MTA hit the transit agency with $1.2 billion in injury and damaged property claims, seriously impacting the affordability of transit.</p>
Blog post
September 27, 2007, 4pm PDT

The newest Texas Transportation Institute Urban Mobility Report was recently released, stimulating discussion of congestion costs and potential solutions. Here are some things you should know when evaluating these issues.

Todd Litman