Food

A team of Canadian MBA students has won $1 million to alleviate urban hunger with insect-based foods, reports Mary Jander.
Sep 29, 2013   Future Cities
<em>Miller-McCune</em> talks with vertical farming innovator Dickson Despommier about why his idea is the future of food for cities and how it can go from blueprint to reality.
May 21, 2009   Miller-McCune
A new community program in Rotterdam is bringing a food truck with new eating options -- and business opportunities -- to working class neighborhoods.
Apr 18, 2009   Metropolis
Residents in Venice, Italy, are upset over a plan by the city to accept a $2.7 million subsidy from Coca Cola in exchange for placement of soda machines throughout the historic city.
Feb 24, 2009   BBC
With few options besides sending food scraps to landfills, New Yorkers are composting in their homes.
Feb 23, 2009   The New York Times
This column looks at President-elect Barack Obama's food politics and wonders just how sustainable his administration's food policies will be.
Jan 2, 2009   The Seattle Post-Intelligencer
The next president should take farming seriously and personally, according to Neal Pierce, who writes that rethinking the scale of food production is smart for regions, the environment and the economy.
Oct 27, 2008   Citiwire
More and more lawns across the country are getting axed and replaced with gardens.
Sep 20, 2008   The Oregonian
<p>Vancouver's South East False Creek community is making the production of food one of the major aspects of its preparation for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Its emphasis on local food production is a model other cities may look to follow.</p>
Jul 10, 2008   BBC
<p>Keeping land uses separate is like keeping the ingredients of pizza separate, according to Congress for New Urbanism President John Norquist. The result is an urban pie that doesn't taste as good as it could.</p>
May 16, 2008   Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
<p>That's how many are expected to inhabit the world by 2050. Experts worry over looming food shortages.</p>
Apr 28, 2008   The Christian Science Monitor