Retirement Communities

October 23, 2016, 5am PDT
Though many retirement communities still look just as they have for many decades—defined by cul-de-sacs and golf courses—many seniors are looking for a more urban lifestyle.
The New York Times
December 12, 2015, 11am PST
Planners convene to discuss a model plan for the smart growth of an aging population.
Urban Institute
October 12, 2015, 8am PDT
Seniors are on the cutting edge of a movement to make Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs), otherwise known as golf carts, a viable form of everyday transportation.
The Atlantic
September 18, 2014, 8am PDT
Portland's over-educated, under-employed population is largely a semi-retired community of young adults, according to some. But with rising housing prices and overall cost of living, it is unclear how Portland will retain these characteristics.
The New York Times Magazine
June 2, 2014, 12pm PDT
After postponing home purchases during the recession, people over the age of 55 have been the first group to return to the home buying market.
New York Times
Feature
April 5, 2013, 4pm PDT
Several trends are conspiring to challenge America's ability to house and care for its senior citizens. Utilizing successful examples, architect and planner Eric C.Y. Fang examines how the suburbs can be adapted to support an aging population.
Eric C.Y. Fang
December 5, 2011, 8am PST
Architect Mattias Hollwich talks about BOOM, a community designed with the unique needs of gay and lesbian retirees that has become a blueprint for new retirement developments the world over.
SmartPlanet
March 18, 2010, 11am PDT
There are senior-living and retirement communities all over the U.S., but a new breed of housing for the elderly is emerging in cities across the world: the Naturally Occurring Retirement Community, or NORC.
Urban Omnibus
November 25, 2008, 5am PST
Unable to sell their homes, thousands of aging seniors throughout the U.S. who would have moved to assisted or independent living or retirement communities are staying put - in homes they would love to leave but are financially tied to.
The New York Times