September 13, 2015, 9am PDT
This map tool hows gentrification-related statistics by Bay Area neighborhood, helping communities guess where the heaviest gentrification will occur.
Next City
August 21, 2015, 6am PDT
Joe Cortright criticizes reports linking high median new home sizes to a renewed demand for McMansions. The market for single-family homes, he argues, locks out buyers of modest means. Only the well-off are buying.
City Observatory City Commentary
July 30, 2015, 8am PDT
Central districts have been surging back since the 1980s. But in most cities, the upper third of earners still favor outlying areas and are underrepresented closer to downtown.
City Observatory City Commentary
Blog post
February 3, 2014, 4am PST
A minor word of caution on statistical inference and the stories it can tell
Norman Wright
August 25, 2012, 5am PDT
A quick look at some of Brooklyn's demographic data illustrates a dramatic divide between the Borough's most wealthy and most poor - economic segregation at its extreme in America.
New York Daily News
June 28, 2012, 6am PDT
As new research data on cities pours in daily, interesting patterns emerge regarding income, green space and urban growth. Like people in their genetic make-up, are cities fundamentally all the same?
The Economist
Blog post
May 11, 2012, 9am PDT

People love statistics. They let us understanding the world beyond our own senses. USA Todaypublishes a daily Snapshotwhich presents a graph of random statistics. Sports talk and business analysis are dominated by statistics. We measure our progress, or lack thereof, and compare ourselves with others, based on statistics about our size, activities and accomplishments.

Todd Litman
March 14, 2012, 6am PDT
Ben Hecht contemplates the currency of the digital age and how it will transform the cities we live in.
Living Cities
May 3, 2011, 9am PDT
The New York City Department of Transportation's yearly statistical smorgasbord adds a new tool: neighborhood travel profiles showing how people arrived in eight neighborhoods. In many of them, the number of drivers was in the single digits.
November 2, 2010, 2pm PDT
When it comes to economics, statistics, demographics, development, and our daily actions, city lines don't count for much - neighborhoods and regions are where things happen, says Kaid Benfield.
Sustainable Cities Collective
May 5, 2010, 6am PDT
The Census is going to be wrong, according to this column from <em>The Washington Post</em>. Statistical adjustments help get undercounts closer to reality, but many opponents prevent their use.
The Washington Post
April 24, 2010, 7am PDT
This post from <em>The New Republic</em> explains how the federal budget includes plans to upgrade some of the varied parts that track statistics in the country.
The New Republic
Blog post
November 11, 2008, 8am PST


A few days ago, I was looking at a regional planning document and saw something startling: an assertion that transit ridership in my region has been going down. Since transit ridership has been going up nationwide, I smelled a rat.

After digging around through a big pile of statistics, I realized that there are so many different ways of measuring transit ridership that one can easily prove either that ridership is going up or that ridership is going down. Some possible measurements include:

Michael Lewyn