Presidential Campaign

April 14, 2016, 8am PDT
An article for Next City reveals the transportation policy platforms of Ted Cruz, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Bernie Sanders, asking the question of whether any of them will shift new support to public transit.
Next City
February 1, 2016, 11am PST
All eyes are on Iowa's caucuses today, but presidential campaigns will be touring communities all over the country for months. The APA wants planners to be ready to explain the importance of planning when such rare opportunities arise.
APA Policy News
September 25, 2012, 10am PDT
Andrea Bernstein traces how, in four short years, partisan politics have infected discussions about investment in infrastructure.
Transportation Nation
Blog post
November 2, 2008, 6am PST

With due respect to Frederick Jackson Turner, the American frontier closes on Tuesday.  This time, for good.

Josh Stephens
September 23, 2008, 8am PDT
Last week, transportation Secretary Mary E. Peters announced that the Highway Trust Fund will be empty by Oct. 1st. This editorial considers two possible options to fund transportation.
The Washington Post
September 22, 2008, 7am PDT
Presidential candidate Barack Obama has announced a $5 billion plan to restore the Great Lakes, funded by reductions in tax cuts for oil companies.
The Detroit Free Press
April 4, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>Urban issues and metropolitan policy are noticeably absent from the platforms of the three main presidential candidates.</p>
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Blog post
December 9, 2007, 12pm PST

It's often said that in America, urban development issues are decided at the local level. In general the rule of thumb is accurate, explaining a country home to cities as different in form as Houston, Texas and San Francisco, California. The notable exception to the rule is the country's interstate highway system, build with extensive involvement of the federal government. However, under closer inspection we can find a number of areas where federal funding and policies has a strong impact on urban development. A survey of what the leading presidential candidates are saying about urban policy suggests what priorities our next president may have.

Robert Goodspeed
Blog post
September 6, 2007, 9am PDT

This week Salon.com published a remarkable interview with a contender for the White House. The candidate didn't offer the solution to stabilizing Iraq, strengthening the economy, or bringing down the price of a six-pack (at least not directly), but for the first time in the history of American campaigning that I'm aware of, he referred to the issue of "land use."

Josh Stephens