Peak Oil

Blog post
April 26, 2010, 2pm PDT

I was reading Wendell Cox's recent attack on the Center for Neighborhood Technology's affordability calculations, and was struck by one thing he wrote:“transportation costs will be reduced in the future by the far more fuel efficient vehicles being required by Washington.”* 

In other words, don't worry about Americans being impoverished by the cost of a car for every man, woman, and 16-year old in the House: the technological miracle of fuel efficiency will save us. 

Michael Lewyn
April 16, 2010, 1pm PDT
Surplus oil production capacity could go away in the next two years and shortages could get serious by 2015, says a new report from the U.S. Joint Forces.
August 26, 2009, 2pm PDT
Energy consultant Michael Lynch argues that there are upwards of 10 trillion barrels of oil out there, as opposed to the 2 trillion that peak oil proponents recognize.
New York Times
August 4, 2009, 7am PDT
Peak oil will happen at least 10 years earlier than most governments are expecting, and an oil crunch will occur in the next 5 years, says Dr Fatih Birol, chief economist at the International Energy Agency.
The Independent (UK)
July 14, 2009, 9am PDT
A paper published earlier this year by a team of professors argues that cities need to learn to become more resilient as resources become more scarce.
ASLA's The Dirt blog
May 20, 2009, 12pm PDT
In his new book 'Why Your World is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller' economist Jeff Rubin describes how 'peak oil' will reverse globalization, revitalize cities and reinvigorate Canada's manufacturing base.
The Globe and Mail
April 20, 2009, 1pm PDT
Locals in Sandpoint, Idaho are banding together to join the Transition movement, which started in the U.K. and is geared towards creating new, ecologically-planned communities to survive peak oil and climate change.
The New York Times
April 20, 2009, 10am PDT
'Peak oil' refers to a belief that growing oil demand will outstrip finite oil supplies. Peak U.S. oil consumption is premised on the belief that 2007 marked the peak, population increase notwithstanding, due to efficiency, biofuels and batteries.
The Wall Street Journal
December 11, 2008, 6am PST
With energy and the economy both causing headaches, 2008 has been a big year for local governments recognizing and planning for peak oil. Finding a way forward in a future of constrained energy will require much of planners.
Post Carbon Cities Blog
December 6, 2008, 9am PST
Amory Lovins, co-founder and chairman of Rocky Mountain Institute, believes that governments and the private sector need to identify and remove barriers to energy efficiency, rather than simply promoting "conservation."
November 21, 2008, 2pm PST
Common Current recently released a report ranking U.S. cities on their ability to deal with a peak oil crisis. San Francisco comes out on top and Oklahoma City ranks last.
Common Current
Blog post
November 7, 2008, 6am PST
I'm in philadelphia for a few days to attend the symposium "Re-Imagining Cities: Urban Design After the Age of Oil". Along with a crew of notable writers and bloggers, I'll be writing live blog posts about the conference, all of which will be posted on the website of Next American City magazine. Tune in to their site to follow along.

This symposium has drawn hundreds of participants from around the globe to discuss the changes facing cities and communities as climate changes and resources diminish.
Nate Berg
September 30, 2008, 5am PDT
Daniel Lerch, author of "Post Carbon Cities" presents his thoughts for a new California Dream in a 'post carbon future' in which cars still exist but are used sparingly due to urban planning that reduces their necessity. He looks toward Portland.
The Sacramento Bee
August 20, 2008, 5am PDT
Using the term 'oil supply crunch' as opposed to 'peak oil', this British report indicates that the oil crisis will hit by 2013, with prices jumping to $200/barrel. It states that the problem is not insufficient oil but obstacles to its extraction.
BBC News
June 16, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>Protests both peaceful and violent are breaking out across Europe and Asia as people's livelihoods begin to suffer from soaring fuel costs, and some stores are running out of food as truck drivers go on strike.</p>
This Is London
April 10, 2008, 7am PDT
<p>When it came out in 2004, "The End of Suburbia" was required viewing for anti-sprawl activists. Now, four years later, the film is both quaint and frighteningly prophetic, writes Dorothy Woodend.</p>
The Tyee
March 24, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>Report ranks largest 50 US cities by their readiness for $4+ a gallon gas and $100+ a barrel oil prices</p>
Common Current
March 12, 2008, 9am PDT
<p>James Howard Kuntsler muses on how the end of cheap oil will mean the parallel decline of the suburban sprawl economy of the South and its NASCAR subculture.</p>
Blog post
February 6, 2008, 2pm PST
Who doesn’t love the Apocalypse? Society collapses, people run around in chaos, and we try to imitate the survival strategies culled from too many Hollywood end-of-the world blockbusters. Apocalyptic predictions have always been part of American culture, and why not?
Greg Smithsimon
Blog post
September 5, 2007, 8am PDT

My Toyota Prius just turned 100,000. That’s quite a milestone for a car and it may be a harbinger of things to come. Many planners are betting so-called “peak oil” will undermine our car culture because we won’t have the fuel to feed them. The history of my Prius suggests otherwise.

Samuel Staley