European Cities

December 25, 2011, 1pm PST
Holiday festival markets are flourishing in central city squares across America, following the model of the great Christmas markets of Germany and other European countries.
Citiwire
December 13, 2011, 5am PST
A German led initiative called 'Desertec,' aims to provide 15% of Europe's electricity by 2050 through a vast network of solar and wind farms stretching right across the MENA region and connecting to Europe via direct current transmission cables.
The Guardian
August 3, 2011, 2pm PDT
Frank Gruber asks, "why, not how." Many of the explanations for decline are clear; why it was allowed to happen, less so. Gruber highlights "suspects" of what might have led to cities' destruction.
The Huffington Post
July 21, 2011, 5am PDT
Bicycling is growing in popularity in the U.S., but it still isn't considered a serious form of transportation as it is in Europe, according to this piece from <em>Yale Environment 360</em>.
Yale Environment 360
July 14, 2011, 11am PDT
Berlin, Brussels or Bruges? Against the backdrop of an ongoing debt crisis, planning pundits deliberate on which European city is the true "dynamic center of Europe."
The New York Times
April 22, 2011, 1pm PDT
The U.S. often gets a bad rap for its sprawling suburbs and unplanned development, but Robert Kwolek notes that many European cities and other parts of the world aren't far behind.
Sustainable Cities Collective
July 7, 2010, 2pm PDT
A decade after its inception, Shanghai's One City, Nine Towns project, an ambitious attempt to manage the city's massive population growth via the creation of international-themed satellite communities, has failed to deliver hoped-for results.
Assembly
June 3, 2008, 11am PDT
French President Sarkozy's call for 'audacious' plans for a Paris of the future has been answered by some of the world's top architects and designers, but some wonder how any of the plans can work within the constraints of the existing city.
The Globe & Mail
Blog post
May 13, 2008, 7am PDT

Some commentators argue that sprawl is an inevitable result of affluence, based on European development patterns. These pundits tell a simple story: European urban cores are losing population and becoming more automobile-dependent - just like American cities. So if Europe can’t beat sprawl, neither can America.

Michael Lewyn
Blog post
July 17, 2007, 10pm PDT

WROCLAW, Poland--I have been swanning about Eastern Europe for the better part of two months, wandering the streets of cities large and small, famous and obscure. As should be apparent to anyone short of Toby Keith or James Inhofe, even the most undistinguished European city could teach any American city a thing or two about charm, walkability, and gracious living.

Josh Stephens