New Geography

August 30, 2009, 7am PDT
Towns with universities are doing better through the economic crisis than most, attracting jobs and preserving property values.
New Geography
August 4, 2009, 6am PDT
Downtowns used to serve primarily as the economic and job hub of a community, but are shifting to be more focused on providing a entertainment center and civic forum.
New Geography
July 10, 2009, 5am PDT
Telecommuting should be considered an aspect of transportation, according to this piece from <em>New Geography</em>.
New Geography
June 25, 2009, 1pm PDT
A report from the US Census Bureau shows that the nation continues to suburbanize.
New Geography
June 22, 2009, 12pm PDT
Texas Governor Rick Perry recently vetoed a bill that would have created a state level "smart growth" program.
New Geography
June 22, 2009, 8am PDT
The Economist magazine has published it's list of the most livable cities in the world. But quite a few of these cities have the most unaffordable housing, complains Owen McShane.
New Geography
June 16, 2009, 1pm PDT
The U.S. Bureau of the Census is producing new data that shows how infill development is affecting urban areas. Wendell Cox says that the new data shows that infill has been happening since 1960 with or without mandates.
New Geography
June 15, 2009, 8am PDT
As farmland prices skyrocketed, so did the cost of growing a suburb.
New Geography
May 21, 2009, 7am PDT
Wendell Cox argues that the growth of the suburbs is not attributable to flight from cities, but to residents of small towns and the countryside moving to denser living.
New Geography
May 17, 2009, 1pm PDT
Rick Harrison argues that smart growth looks good on paper, but in application the density creates a whole host of problems.
New Geography
March 22, 2009, 11am PDT
Andrés Duany observes that American planners and architects are misunderstanding New Orleans by thinking of it as an American city rather than a Caribbean one.
New Geography
February 4, 2009, 11am PST
Maybe they're not in Manhattan, but Queens and Brooklyn are still home to much of New York's diverse middle class. And although facing some economic stress, they're not likely to go anywhere soon, according to Joel Kotkin.
New Geography
January 15, 2009, 7am PST
This piece from <em>New Geography</em> looks disparagingly at an idea in San Francisco to allow corporate sponsorship of the Golden Gate Bridge in order to raise money for infrastructure projects.
New Geography
December 10, 2008, 6am PST
According to Kirk Rogers, European suburbs are not all that different from American ones--they indulge the need for space, good schools, and cars-- and they're there to stay.
New Geography
November 12, 2008, 6am PST
Wendell Cox looks at how single-family detached housing came to be, and why it's likely to remain a popular option for the middle class.
New Geography
November 7, 2008, 9am PST
Joel Kotkin believes that the Obama victory is a sign that the 'creative class' - as detailed by Richard Florida - is coming into power, and that traditional business will be pushed aside.
New Geography
October 31, 2008, 12pm PDT
Joel Kotkin derides urban boosters who have looked to external forces -- such as the mortgage meltdown -- to fuel an "urban renaissance", rather than looking at altering their own economic environments to be more attractive to investors.
New Geography
October 14, 2008, 12pm PDT
One city in Virginia has gone from suburban to (quasi-)urban in just a few years.
New Geography
October 8, 2008, 10am PDT
Ottawa's high-tech sector has burgeoned. More of its residents are employed in fields of engineering and science than in any other Canadian city, making it a high-tech hotbed not unlike those of the U.S.
New Geography
October 8, 2008, 7am PDT
Recognizing a need for formal cooperation between the regions in the middle of North America, the author of this article calls for a North American Central Economic Region.
New Geography
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