New Geography

December 26, 2012, 1pm PST
Acela has improved connectivity along the Northeast Corridor, but is that actually a good thing? Aaron M. Renn argues that high-speed rail has actually hurt America by giving the finance industry a stranglehold over fiscal and monetary policies.
New Geography
November 14, 2012, 1pm PST
Wendell Cox rebuts the work of Arthur C. Nelson, who has projected CA as over-supplied with detached housing and in demand of small lot and multi-unit housing. Nelson's work has been the basis of long-range regional planning throughout the state.
New Geography
October 25, 2012, 9am PDT
A vast expanse of prairies and grasslands, the Great Plains have long been considered a barren wasteland with little potential for growth. A new report by Joel Kotkin, Praxis Strategy Group, and Kevin Mulligan of Texas Tech claims otherwise.
New Geography
October 2, 2012, 6am PDT
Wendell Cox delves into the latest numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau that have prompted some to herald a return to America's downtowns, and argues that reports of such population growth are vastly overblown.
New Geography
September 20, 2012, 5am PDT
Jeff Khau examines the rise in the teleworking population and what this demographic shift means for cities.
New Geography
September 13, 2012, 2pm PDT
A growing list of cities are banking their economic development on the medical and educational sectors, which have consistently grown over the past few decades. Aaron Renn examines why overreliance on eds and meds is problematic.
New Geography
September 4, 2012, 12pm PDT
Richey Piiparinen discusses the "Frankenstein effects" of place-making, in which, he argues, the diversity of people and place that attracts the creative class is eventually forced out by those in search of the "highest and best use."
New Geography
September 2, 2012, 11am PDT
Lisa Gu pens a passionate defense of Chinese cities in response to a recent article that claims they are virtually "unlivable."
New Geography
August 10, 2012, 12pm PDT
Joel Kotkin looks at a new analysis of Census data by Wendell Cox that may upend the "conventional wisdom" that "talented, highly-skilled and highly educated people" are clustering in America's coastal cities.
New Geography
August 7, 2012, 1pm PDT
In an op-ed for <em>New Geography</em>, Skip Preble argues why communities can benefit from incorporating market analysis and financial modeling techniques into their planning processes.
New Geography
June 26, 2012, 12pm PDT
Matthew Stevenson anticipates the end of the bicycle in China's major cities, now overrun with scooters and scrambling for Western status symbols – in spite of ever-worsening traffic.
New Geography
November 13, 2011, 1pm PST
Alan Pisarski says despite reports of growth in walking, biking, carpooling and transit, very little has changed in the U.S., and people will always over-report their good intentions.
New Geography
July 27, 2011, 11am PDT
The youth of America will ditch its cities in favor of the suburbs, according to this op-ed from Joel Kotkin.
New Geography
June 8, 2011, 1pm PDT
Calling California's attempts at environmental responsibility a "green jihad," Joel Kotkin argues that the state's "ideological extremism" has led to illogical economic and political decisions - similar to those made in the Islamic Republic of Iran.
New Geography
June 5, 2011, 5am PDT
A combination of favorable factors have made Orlando the site of a growing high-tech military research/simulation center. Pentagon spending already employs 9,000 more Floridians than the state's hallowed agriculture industry, writes Richard Reep.
New Geography
May 27, 2011, 12pm PDT
Richard Reep explains how developers, contractors, and even home-buyers in Florida contributed to the growth for growth's sake attitude which has left the Florida landscape littered with poorly built condos and plenty of lessons to be learned.
New Geography
May 24, 2011, 11am PDT
Yes, people walk around more, less obesity, etc. But a report shows that city kids are less frequently allowed outside to play for safety concerns.
New Geography
May 19, 2011, 11am PDT
Detroit should look to a neighbor in the north for advice on rebounding from industrial decline, according to this piece from <em>New Geography</em>, which argues that Winnipeg has already paved the way.
New Geography
May 8, 2011, 1pm PDT
Joel Kotkin says that despite the fashion for density among urban planners, the future relies on "dispersion" and focusing on developing small and mid-range cities.
New Geography
May 4, 2011, 6am PDT
Megacities are quickly on the rise in China. But as this post from <em>New Geography</em> argues, they've managed to avoid problems currently faced by other megacities in developing nations.
New Geography