New Geography

March 16, 2016, 8am PDT
Writing for New Geography, Fannis Grammenos expresses skepticism that more compact cities are more affordable cities. In fact, Grammenos argues that just the opposite is true.
New Geography
October 20, 2015, 7am PDT
As Houston, Dallas and other sun belt cities build out their light-rail systems, some are asking if the investment is worth it.
New Geography
February 24, 2015, 11am PST
Most of the suburbs of the 20th century weren't designed to last more than a generation or two. As many suburbs decay, or get replaced by farther-flung rings of new bedroom communities, Carmel, Indiana is trying something different.
New Geography
December 6, 2014, 7am PST
Aaron Renn provides a dissenting argument on the implications of peak car, namely, "if we’ve really reached peak car, maybe we really can build our way out of congestion after all."
New Geography
November 1, 2014, 1pm PDT
A recent post identifies a sweet spot in the urban market: affordable cities like Cincinnati and others in the Rust Belt that provide an attractive alternative to more expensive, if more famous, cities on the coasts.
New Geography
March 20, 2014, 11am PDT
A recent study claimed that transit ridership had reached the highest levels seen in 57 years. Wendell Cox, however, argues that the narrative about a “fundamental shift” in the transportation paradigm is a misrepresentation of the truth.
New Geography
March 6, 2014, 12pm PST
Wendell Cox reviews a new working paper by Alain Bertaud called “Cities as Labor Markets.” Cox calls the lesson contained therein “Urban Planning 101” and a “much needed midcourse correction to urban planning around the world.”
New Geography
February 19, 2014, 1pm PST
A new report called “Sustaining Prosperity: A Long Term Vision for the New Orleans Region,” authored by Joel Kotkin, celebrates the rebirth of New Orleans and sets a five point plan for ensuring New Orleans’ long-term prosperity.
New Geography
February 12, 2014, 1pm PST
A recent news broadcast showed the mayor of Tacoma with a backdrop of the city of Seattle. The feeling of being hidden in the shadow of larger, older neighbor cities is familiar all over the world, but what are “kid sister” cities to do about it?
New Geography
January 31, 2014, 12pm PST
The United State Conference of Mayors recently released a report projecting moderate growth for almost all of the country’s metropolitan areas. A survey of coverage on the report reveals multiple readings of the state of the economy.
New Geography
September 14, 2013, 9am PDT
Remember those recent articles in respected national news organizations that reported a million baby boomers had moved to America's 50 largest cities between 2000 and 2010? According to Wendell Cox, they had the story backwards.
New Geography
September 9, 2013, 7am PDT
The constant criticism of America's freeways makes it difficult to appreciate this infrastructure as important economic and cultural artifacts and a wonderful way to see the country.
New Geography
August 24, 2013, 7am PDT
The Census Bureau's questionable methodology for estimating municipal population growth has resulted in counter-intuitive and often outrageous numbers, warns Aaron M. Renn.
New Geography
July 10, 2013, 1pm PDT
Calling 'white infill' the new 'white flight', Richey Piiparinen argues that urban thinkers need to consider whether the back-to-the-city trend is exacerbating inequity and segregation.
New Geography
June 4, 2013, 12pm PDT
While conceding that suburbia, and home construction patterns, will change in the coming decades, a new report from Joel Kotkin argues that the "dream" of suburban American homeownership is alive and well and poised to remain relevant.
New Geography
May 25, 2013, 1pm PDT
After a sharp decline during the recession, an industrial expansion is helping to drive job growth in many of America’s metropolitan areas. New analysis outlines the country’s best manufacturing ‘storylines’.
New Geography
April 3, 2013, 2pm PDT
The post office and the church are just two of the many building types which once occupied central places in our communities, but have become obsolete due to cultural, economic, and demographic shifts. To what lengths should we go to preserve them?
New Geography
February 26, 2013, 2pm PST
Accounting for 45% of America's land mass and 30% of its population, the Great Plains, the Intermountain West, the Gulf states, and the Southeastern industrial belt are key to a national revival, says a new report from the Manhattan Institute.
New Geography
February 15, 2013, 5am PST
Anyone with an Internet connection can tell you when a city was founded. But after the trauma of urban renewal and suburban flight, how much historic fabric remains? Wendell Cox ranks metropolitan areas by their shares of pre-World War II homes.
New Geography
January 3, 2013, 7am PST
Richey Piiparinen explores the "original sin" of the quest for urban “livability” - economic development - and examines what the pitfalls are when cities are designed for high-valued consumers rather than people.
New Geography