July 20, 2011, 11am PDT
Using remote sensing, GPS technology and other high-tech strategies, city traffic planners aim to clear Midtown's infamous traffic problems - from Queens. The $1.6 million investment will tackle a problem costing the city about $13 billion a year.
New York Post
February 5, 2011, 11am PST
With GPS technology ubiquitous, the lighthouse perched high on a cliff may soon become a relic.
December 7, 2010, 5am PST
Russia has been developing a $2 billion alternative to the American GPS system. This week, a programming error sent 3 critical satellites crashing into the Pacific Ocean.
The Christian Science Monitor
September 26, 2010, 7am PDT
"Indoor positioning systems" are getting closer to reality, placing products at your fingertips by tracking them down within the store.
Directions Magazine
September 13, 2010, 10am PDT
Ron Ringen has logged more than 1,400 animals for a roadkill project. "I'm almost a fanatic with it," he said. "You get hooked."
The New York Times
May 11, 2010, 6am PDT
The increase in transit ridership and carsharing isn't just due to the rise in gas prices, but also the rise in new technologies providing up-to-the-minute reports on location and ride availability.
New Urban News email
Blog post
April 19, 2010, 8am PDT

With the brilliant help of graduates from Hoboken's Stevens Institute of Technology, our local community shuttle bus (a.k.a. The Hop, formerly known as The Downtown Crosstown Shuttle) can now be viewed live on the city's website as it cruises along narrow Hoboken city streets from 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM (EST), Monday through Friday.  If you're not near the internet, try texting “crosstown” to 41411 to get a return text with the location of the bus' whereabouts whenever it's running, then run down to the corner before you miss it!

Ian Sacs
April 8, 2010, 10am PDT
New York City has GPS data from tens of thousands of taxis and is beginning to mine that information to improve its streets. We talked to some transportation experts for their ideas on how to use it.
March 26, 2010, 6am PDT
Through a survey of New York City taxis with GPS tracking devices, the city has created a database of speeds and routes that gives them a clear picture of the state of traffic in the city.
The New York Times
March 22, 2010, 6am PDT
In a study in Europe using cellphone GPS data, researchers discovered that people rarely leave a six-mile area around where they live. GPS cellphone data is being used for a host of urban planning studies like this.
Planning Commissioners Journal
February 3, 2010, 5am PST
Gigaom looks at a handful of "augmented reality" apps, both current and projected, that create an interface between the internet and the world around us.
November 16, 2009, 11am PST
Imagine this: Replacing the sales tax on purchasing a new vehicle and annual, 'fixed' fees with a VMT fee based on size, weight, and CO2 emissions of the vehicle. This is the plan of the Dutch government to reduce congestion and greenhouse gases.
Blog post
September 7, 2009, 6am PDT

What's better than Twitter in the city? An iPhone. With a connection to the Internet, built-in camera, location-awareness, 3-access accelerometer and colorful display, the Apple iPhone has become much more than a mobile phone: it's a sophisticated mobile computing platform. Combine this technology with a library of thousands of programs and growing ecosystem of developers, the iPhone is powerful and versatile tool to transform how people interact with their surroundings.

A growing number of iPhone apps are taking advantage of the phone's functionality to allow people to navigate, measure, observe, and interact with cities in new ways. This post describes some I have come across for e-government, urban sensing and interaction, and navigation. First, a caveat: I don't actually own one of the devices myself and haven't tested the apps (yet). I've certainly missed many, so leave your favorites in the comments below.

Robert Goodspeed
February 3, 2009, 10am PST
A long-help plan to install GPS-ready bus tracking equipment to New York City buses has been pushed off indefinitely.
NY1 News
January 5, 2009, 8am PST
Oregon was the first state to study replacing state gas taxes with a Vehicle Miles Traveled fee in 2007. Now Gov. Kulongoski is taking the next step - introducing legislation to replace the 24-cent gas tax with a VMT fee that applies GPS technology.
Corvallis Gazette Times
September 2, 2008, 1pm PDT
'Pay as you drive' insurance will soon be a reality in California, surviving the state senate as a voluntary program that environmental groups say will encourage people to drive less by saving them money on their car insurance.
San Francisco Examiner
June 18, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>The use of geographic information systems for the public good is a rapidly growing field. The technology shows great promise for discovering unequal distribution of resources and environmental racism, writes Peter Manzo.</p>
Stanford Social Innovation Review
June 7, 2008, 9am PDT
<p>GPS from cellphones is enabling exciting research into human behavior, but European studies show that our behavior is rarely exciting.</p>
International Herald Tribune
Blog post
September 30, 2007, 8pm PDT

I live a ten-minute cab ride from the airport. I love it. Many a morning, I have stumbled down the porch steps in flip-flops and a business suit, carrying an overnight bag and high heels to make a flight in an hour’s time. Several weeks ago, I stepped into a cab and chirped my usual, “Good morning—National Airport, please!” and settled back into the seat, ready to finish applying eyeshadow.

“Do you know how to get there?,” the driver asked.

Jess Zimbabwe
Blog post
May 10, 2007, 6am PDT

BEIJING, 9 MAY 2007--Anyone questioning China's potential to become the dominant player in the 21st century and beyond need look no further than the Beijing Transportation Information Center. The entrepreneurial leader of the center, Mr. WANG gang, has lead the development of the most innovative system for managing traffic congestion I've seen, putting U.S. systems to shame and leapfrogging over London's cutting edge signal coordinatin system. Rather than try to regulate congestion by limiting automobile use, they have figured out a way to use technology to make its use more efficient.

Samuel Staley