Public Transit

June 1, 2011, 9am PDT
Los Angeles' public transit authority has joined those of other major U.S. cities in providing a real-time tool for checking to see how soon buses will arrive at specific stops.
Los Angeles Times
May 31, 2011, 12pm PDT
Transportation for America (TfA), a campaign to strengthen the nation’s transportation network, released an update to its “Dangerous by Design” report, an analysis of pedestrian safety in the design and use of American streets.
TheCityFix.com
May 28, 2011, 7am PDT
A new study says that Los Angeles, Cleveland, Las Vegas, Eugene and Pittsburgh are leading the surge with the best bus rapid transit (BRT) systems in the nation.
The Institute of Transportation and Development Policy
May 16, 2011, 12pm PDT
Google announces the addition of D.C.'s Metro and bus routes to their online and mobile maps, including connections to other commuter transit systems.
TheCityFix.com
May 13, 2011, 1pm PDT
The Brookings Institution recently analyzed the top 100 metropolitan areas in the U.S. to see how easy it is to use transit. <em>Time</em> presents the best and worst from the list, which includes some surprises.
Time
April 14, 2011, 7am PDT
Even office parks in the exurbs can have high rates of transit use, according to success seen at an office park in San Ramon, California.
The Atlantic
April 11, 2011, 5am PDT
As reporter Robert J. Hawkins notes, "It's like 2008 all over again." Back then, skyrocketing gas prices sent people fleeing to use public transit. Today, the pattern remains the same, at least in San Diego.
San Diego Union-Tribune
March 26, 2011, 1pm PDT
A new report is cause for concern in Canada. It shows that poor public transit and bad traffic are damaging the economic engine of cities like Toronto.
The Globe and Mail
February 15, 2011, 8am PST
One way to help build an expensive new extension of L.A's subway system is to accept corporate sponsorships, argues Joel Epstein in this op-ed.
Los Angeles Business Journal
Blog post
February 13, 2011, 6pm PST

My sense is that most new urbanists and smart growth advocates were happy to see Barack Obama elected President two years ago.  While John McCain opposed Amtrak and had not been overly supportive of local public transit, Obama created an Administration full of advocates for transit and urbanism, and high-speed rail is one of his Administration's signature programs.  So the Obama Administration will slow sprawl, and will make our cities more transit-oriented, prosperous and walkable.   Right? 

Michael Lewyn
February 4, 2011, 9am PST
Bus rapid transit is growing in popularity throughout the world, though implementation is lacking in the U.S.
THE DIRT
January 16, 2011, 9am PST
It was nearly 50 years ago, when streetcars were seen on the roadways of downtown Washington, DC. Dan Tangherlini, the former transportation director for the District discusses why streetcars matter in the United States capital.
The City Fix
January 11, 2011, 11am PST
Metro stations, train stations and streetcar systems have distinct ways of showing how to get from one area to another. TheCityFix's Jonna McKone looks at mass transit systems from Mexico City to Paris and the visual representations used in each one.
TheCityFix
January 5, 2011, 2pm PST
Prevailing wisdom is that transit mode and frequency of service is dependent on residential density, which leaves low density, outer suburbs in a lurch, instilling an auto-dependent lifestyle. Not so, says Australian researcher and author Paul Mees.
The Age: Victoria
Blog post
December 14, 2010, 9pm PST
As Congress begins to draft transportation legislation next year, fiscal scarcity may induce a fight between transit and highway advocates over federal funding, rather than the cooperation of the last few years.  And if highway advocates seek to tear down federal support for other forms of transportation, they will probably rely heavily on federalism considerations, arguing that highways are inherently an interstate concern while transit and non-motorized forms of transportation are a nonfederal concern.  For example, Alan Pisarski writes: “If sidewalks and bike paths are federal then everythingis federal.”

There are two flaws in this argument.  First of all, highways are not always primarily an interstate concern

Michael Lewyn
November 29, 2010, 5am PST
Randal O'Toole argues that transit will never be energy efficient because ridership is never high enough to warrant the energy expelled.
The Antiplanner
Blog post
November 15, 2010, 5am PST
Virtually every modern economy is mixed: governments produce some goods and services and private companies produce others. Governments generally provide those goods and services that are either considered essential and should be available to everybody regardless of ability to pay, or that require strategic coordination, including police protection, basic education, transportation infrastructure, parks, and public health services.

Transportation facilities and services are among these basic government functions.

Todd Litman
November 5, 2010, 10am PDT
Business interests on a downtown commercial street complain a transit mall is making the area less attractive for retail.
Streetsblog
November 1, 2010, 2pm PDT
Fear of crime and uncertainty about safety keep many people from using public transit, according to a new study. But how should transit agencies react?
Next American City
October 26, 2010, 11am PDT
Walder’s arrival from London, where he transformed a flagging bus and subway system, brought high hopes for New York’s transit system, says Michael Grynbaum. But is he meeting the expectations of riders and officials?
The New York Times