Public Transit

A study examines the impact of a worldwide shift away from automobile infrastructure and finds a staggering amount of potential benefits by the year 2050.
Sep 18, 2014   UC Davis
Los Angeles' public transit authority has joined those of other major U.S. cities in providing a real-time tool for checking to see how soon buses will arrive at specific stops.
Jun 1, 2011   Los Angeles Times
Transportation for America (TfA), a campaign to strengthen the nation’s transportation network, released an update to its “Dangerous by Design” report, an analysis of pedestrian safety in the design and use of American streets.
May 31, 2011   TheCityFix.com
A new study says that Los Angeles, Cleveland, Las Vegas, Eugene and Pittsburgh are leading the surge with the best bus rapid transit (BRT) systems in the nation.
May 28, 2011   The Institute of Transportation and Development Policy
Google announces the addition of D.C.'s Metro and bus routes to their online and mobile maps, including connections to other commuter transit systems.
May 16, 2011   TheCityFix.com
The Brookings Institution recently analyzed the top 100 metropolitan areas in the U.S. to see how easy it is to use transit. <em>Time</em> presents the best and worst from the list, which includes some surprises.
May 13, 2011   Time
Even office parks in the exurbs can have high rates of transit use, according to success seen at an office park in San Ramon, California.
Apr 14, 2011   The Atlantic
As reporter Robert J. Hawkins notes, "It's like 2008 all over again." Back then, skyrocketing gas prices sent people fleeing to use public transit. Today, the pattern remains the same, at least in San Diego.
Apr 11, 2011   San Diego Union-Tribune
A new report is cause for concern in Canada. It shows that poor public transit and bad traffic are damaging the economic engine of cities like Toronto.
Mar 26, 2011   The Globe and Mail
One way to help build an expensive new extension of L.A's subway system is to accept corporate sponsorships, argues Joel Epstein in this op-ed.
Feb 15, 2011   Los Angeles Business Journal
My sense is that most new urbanists and smart growth advocates were happy to see Barack Obama elected President two years ago.  While John McCain opposed Amtrak and had not been overly supportive of local public transit, Obama created an Administration full of advocates for transit and urbanism, and high-speed rail is one of his Administration's signature programs.  So the Obama Administration will slow sprawl, and will make our cities more transit-oriented, prosperous and walkable.   Right?  Opinion
Feb 13, 2011   By Michael Lewyn