Beijing

September 4, 2010, 1pm PDT
Marina Hyde writes that the "horrible thing about China's 62-mile nine-day jam was that it destroyed the certainty that travel will inevitably result in arrival."
The Guardian
August 30, 2010, 12pm PDT
The recent 11-day traffic jam in China was no fluke. As <em>The Economist</em> explains, the crushing congestion is little more than a real-world example of imbalances in supply and demand.
The Economist
August 24, 2010, 7am PDT
A major route in China has been slammed with a major traffic jam, spanning more than 60 miles and lasting for more than a week.
BBC
August 1, 2010, 7am PDT
That's the name of the new project being built in the Beijing Watercube, one of the city's highlight architectural creations built for the 2008 Summer Olympics.
Contract
July 23, 2010, 10am PDT
Adam Meyer, an architects practicing in Chengdu, scrutinizes some of the myths and projections surrounding China's rapid economic growth which have become so popular in the last half decade.
New Geography
June 30, 2010, 2pm PDT
By 2030, China will have 220 cities containing a population of 1 million or more, 24 of which will be megacities. The boom China is expected to go through, 'boggles the imagination of North Americans and Europeans.'
World Changing
June 1, 2010, 10am PDT
Officials in Beijing are planning to build 21 more rail and subways lines by the year 2020.
Global Times
April 29, 2010, 12pm PDT
Wang Jun, author of two best-selling books on urban history and planning in China, became an advocate of historic preservation after watching Beijing's old city destroyed and rebuilt as skyscrapers.
CNN
April 20, 2010, 10am PDT
As Shanghai prepares to host the World Expo beginning next month, the aftertaste of over-investment in Beijing's 2008 Summer Olympics and that event's now-empty venues is causing some to question the wisdom of the Expo and its long-term impact.
The Washington Post
February 5, 2010, 11am PST
Underused since the end of the 2008 Summer Olympics, the Beijing Water Cube swimming stadium will be converted into a water park.
Agence France Presse
January 6, 2010, 12pm PST
This slideshow from the <em>BBC</em> explores how Beijing's iconic Bird's Nest Olympic stadium is being reused -- as a kids theme park.
BBC
November 10, 2009, 12pm PST
Chinese officials have decided to expand Beijing's Central Business District, clearing out nearly four square kilometers with 10,000 homes on it in the process.
The Infrastructurist
Blog post
September 7, 2009, 7pm PDT

I have lived in Boston, Chicago, London, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco but I have never seen anything like Beijing.  Over the next two weeks, I'm giving a series of talks at Tsinghua, Peking University and the Lincoln Institute, and the CASS.  While I was little surprised to see Mao's face on all of the money and to not be able to access my blog, I have been very impressed with everything I see and I see glimpses of a future "green city".

Matthew E. Kahn
September 4, 2009, 7am PDT
New world cities are emerging, and the "first truly urban century" will be shaped by the way increasing wealth is handled in places like Mumbai, Bangalore, Shanghai, Beijing, Sao Paulo and Dubai.
Forbes
August 20, 2009, 6am PDT
Beijing could be heading towards a sprawling future, according to a new report from the World Bank. Despite expanding transit options, the location of jobs is pushing more people out from the center of the city.
The New York Times Style Magazine
August 18, 2009, 9am PDT
After an unstoppable run of megaprojects being built with an eye on the Olympics, architects are now designing smaller, human-scale projects in between the cracks.
Asia Times
August 15, 2009, 9am PDT
As the host of the 2010 World Expo, Shanghai is sparing no expense. Civic investment and projects are expected to eclipse those of Beijing when it hosted the 2008 Summer Olympics.
The New York Times
Blog post
June 30, 2009, 11am PDT

The Olympics can be awesome for cities. Or they can be devastating. Rarely they're both, and most often they are an economic drain caused by over-investment in facilities with limited long-term usability. So when London's plans for a 2012 Summer Olympics stadium that would reduce from 80,000 seats during the games to a more realistically usable 25,000 seats after, Olympics experts, city officials and taxpayers rejoiced. But recent news has turned that rejoice to disgust.

Nate Berg
May 1, 2009, 8am PDT
Despite efforts to clean up Beijing during last year's Olympic Games, pollutant reductions were very minor, according to a new report.
ScienceNOW Daily News
Blog post
April 16, 2009, 12am PDT

Whether you've realized it yet or not, soccer is a big deal in this gloabalizing world. And every four years it's a huge deal for one country: the host of the FIFA World Cup. All eyes are on the host country for the 32-team tournament, which is the most-watched sporting event in the world. And though showtime is just one month long, the host spends years vying, preparing and investing for the tournament. It has major potential to spur broad countrywide improvements and economic development. So when the U.S. made news recently by offering forth 70 stadia as possible host sites for either the 2018 or 2022 World Cup (along with a reputation booster from President Barack Obama), I had to filter out my national pride. Sure, the U.S. would make a good and clearly able host for the event, but it seems that the potential of the World Cup could be better directed towards a country that really needs large-scale civic improvement and investment.

Nate Berg