Beijing

China has added to the ranks of the world's megacities at a ridiculous clip. Even so, inland cities have tended to languish in anonymity. With new policies and economic orientations, the Chonquings are starting to compete with the Shanghais.
Yesterday   The Diplomat
Net deforestation continues, but at a slower rate as the world's largest ecological engineering project stretches for a planned 2,800 miles. It is hoped the new trees will halt the advance of the Gobi Desert.
Apr 29, 2015   Quartz
If you want great access to an airport, go overseas—that's the main finding of a study by Golden Gateway Alliance, a Manhattan-based airport advocacy organization. Tied for dead-last in terms of access is Denver and a certain New York airport.
Feb 17, 2015   New York Post
Research suggests China’s current urbanization policy forgoes $2 trillion in growth over the next ten years. That is, unless the government funnels even more migrants into major population centers and develops for density.
Oct 24, 2014   Bloomberg News
The October issue of Land Lines reveals the remarkable story of how an estimated one million people came to live in subterranean apartments in Beijing.
Oct 13, 2014   Land Lines
With rapidly urbanizing metro areas, some cities are not looking to build up, or spread out, anymore. Rather they have begun to grow into underground spaces.
Sep 27, 2014   Bloomberg News
In this Sunday Review editorial, The New York Times applauds China's announcement that it will ban coal burning in the Beijing region by 2020, but warns that some solutions to air pollution will exacerbate climate change.
Aug 26, 2014   The New York Times
Blog Post
Sometime in the next few months a bell will ring in New York City and, on the other side of the world, an age-old pattern of urban growth will begin to crumble. Blog Post
Jun 8, 2014   By Josh Stephens
What's causing underground parking spaces to go for $160,000 in Beijing? Quartz reports that demand, narrow roads, resident disenfranchisement and old zoning law give developers the upper-hand.
May 26, 2014   Quartz
Chinese and Indian cities are known for having some of the most polluted air in the world. You've likely heard about Beijing's severe smog; but in Delhi, where pollution levels are regularly higher, the hazardous air gets little notice. Why?
Jan 29, 2014   The New York Times
The admission is the first from a Chinese official that puts a human cost on the country's huge air pollution problem, largely stemming from coal-burning power plants. But Shanghai had good news this week too. Rain brought blue skies and clean air.
Jan 11, 2014   Marketplace