Planning Education

Feature
November 14, 2016, 2pm PST
Professional doctorates or certificates of advanced graduate study (CAGS) can offer an alternative to a PH.D. for planners looking to expand their education beyond the master's degree.
Justin B. Hollander and Amanda Kohn
Blog post
August 29, 2016, 11am PDT
Making better places is a core value for many planners, but don’t let a lack of passion stand between you and a strong career in planning.
Pete Sullivan
August 23, 2016, 1pm PDT
How can the Global South implement the New Urban Agenda with colonial-era curricula and little investment in training? Zambia offers a new model.
Citiscope
June 8, 2016, 1pm PDT
This month a new generation of urban planners will transition from planning school to the workplace—it is a season for new ideas.
North Carolina Chapter of the American Planning Association
Blog post
May 7, 2016, 1pm PDT
Growing up in Rockaway, Queens led me to the planning profession, just as home town experiences lead many students to city planning. It's easy to forget why we became planners: we need to remember.
Bruce Stiftel
March 15, 2016, 7am PDT
A recent article in the Washington Post does a nice job of describing transportation planning as an exciting field, with important and engaging applications.
The Washington Post
Feature
October 27, 2014, 5am PDT
The following interview, as published in the 4th Edition of the Planetizen Guide to Graduate Urban Planning Programs, features Peter Park, owner of Peter J Park, LLC and an instructor at the University of Colorado-Denver and Harvard University.
Peter Park
Feature
October 3, 2014, 10am PDT
The 4th Edition of the Planetizen Guide to Graduate Urban Planning Programs is now available. The new Guide includes Planetizen's ranking of the Top 25 Graduate Urban Planning Programs.
Planetizen
Feature
June 12, 2013, 4pm PDT
As a new cohort of young planners prepares to enter the field, more than a dozen recent graduates share their insights on how to make the most of a planning education and navigate one of the most challenging job environments in recent memory.
Erica Gutiérrez
Blog post
October 1, 2011, 4pm PDT

The Los Angeles Times recently had a story about the collapse of Solyndra – the once heralded poster-child of the Obama administration’s green jobs plan.  A big part of Solyndra’s demise was due to the rapidly falling price of their competitors’ solar panels.  In 2008, the cost of solar panels was a bit over $4 for each watt generated.  Solyndr

Marlon Boarnet
Blog post
December 1, 2010, 12pm PST

 As students have been choosing classes over the last year, one question I’ve received is: how important is the teacher vs. the subject matter? In general, I argue, your own attitude is the most important factor in how well you learn. However, truly terrible teaching can make that more difficult and truly wonderful teaching can change your life for the better.

Ann Forsyth
Blog post
August 31, 2008, 8am PDT

At the beginning of semester students are signing up for classes and planning their degrees. Lately, a question I have been asked quite frequently is which classes will make new planners most employable? Students ask if computer aided design or GIS will be key. However, surveys of planning practitioners show that a far more basic set of skills is important—skills in communication, information analysis and synthesis, political savvy, and basic workplace competencies and attitudes.

Below, I highlight three of these studies from across three decades:

Ann Forsyth
Blog post
October 31, 2007, 9am PDT

As education has become more expensive students wonder about what they are getting for their money. Evaluations of faculty, rankings of programs, and internet chat-room gossip all aim to find how to purchase the best value for money given a specific set of preferences. However, it is a misunderstanding to see students as primarily consumers of instruction. Rather the best students collaborate with faculty and other students to produce their own learning.

What does this mean? In planning, as an applied profession, the activity of producing learning has a number of components. The following represent just a few of these mechanisms.

Ann Forsyth
Blog post
April 21, 2007, 3pm PDT

Constantly updated, the internet has created an important tool for accessing up-to date information—text, still images, and video. Increasingly it also provides a window into aspects of history, including planning history, that have previously been difficult to find. Documents, indexes to archival materials, and the photographic and map collections of historical societies are accessible online. Less well known are film and video resources—resources that can be played online or downloaded. The Library of Congress, Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division now boasts an outstanding collection of hundreds of videos relevant to urban issues.

Some examples illustrate the range:

Ann Forsyth