Commuting

September 21, 2012, 12pm PDT
New Census data out this week shows the share of Americans commuting by alternatives to the automobile continues to rise. In two-thirds of 342 metropolitan areas for which data was provided, public transit use was up, while solo driving dropped.
USA Today
May 9, 2012, 9am PDT
Nate Berg uncovers yet another study matching long commutes to poor health, from low fitness to high blood pressure.
The Atlantic Cities
March 23, 2012, 8am PDT
WNYC's Andrea Bernstein speaks to "super-commuters", who travel regularly from home to work by air, and uncovers a new way of thinking about where we live and where we work.
Transportation Nation
Blog post
November 2, 2011, 10am PDT

In August, I moved into a high density apartment complex just 1.5 miles from my office and a five minute walk to a bus stop. One of the central advantages of the building's location was its access to alternative transportation modes. While I could park my car for "free" (the real cost is built into the lease), I was interested in keeping it parked as much as possible. Now, after nearly three months of experimentation, I'm ready to give up the bus, and the reasons are central to understanding the future of transit in the US.

Samuel Staley
May 11, 2011, 7am PDT
A new report from The Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia shows that Philadelphia's bicycle mode share is more than double that of Chicago's (the big city with the second-greatest share).
philly.com
February 28, 2011, 5am PST
The new jobs in New York City aren't in Manhattan, but in the boroughs. For low-income workers to be able to access those opportunities, improved bus service will be necessary, says a new report.
Streetsblog
January 31, 2011, 7am PST
The amount of people commuting in car pools has nearly halved since 1980.
The New York Times
Feature
December 20, 2010, 10am PST
Bicyclists and transit riders are losers - right? Or are they elitist, sneering yuppies? Brian Ladd says that people's attitudes and transportation choices are shaped by deep-seated feelings about respectability, and it planners should pay attention.
Brian Ladd
December 15, 2010, 12pm PST
<em>TheStreet</em> and <em>Bundle</em> have ranked the best and worst commutes in 90 American cities, based on costs and time.
Bundle
December 1, 2010, 8am PST
This episode of public radio program <em>99% Invisible</em> looks at oil, and how the way people move from work to home has been seemingly designed to waste fuel.
99% Invisible
November 30, 2010, 5am PST
Atlanta's $72 million streetcar plan is taking shape, with lines expected to open in 2013. But not everyone in the city thinks the project is worth the cost.
Los Angeles Times
October 3, 2010, 9am PDT
We've been measuring traffic congestion all wrong, a new report shows, and that's been making more highways look like the solution to long commutes. They're not.
Streetsblog
April 29, 2010, 10am PDT
The suburbanization of business headquarters may be coming to an end.
Harvard Business Review
April 22, 2010, 7am PDT
More and more people working in the San Francisco Bay Area are opting for cheaper housing outside the region. Some are going way outside the region, commuting by airplane from Portland or Seattle.
The Wall Street Journal
April 7, 2010, 10am PDT
There are more extreme commuters (a minimum of 1.5 hrs round trip) than ever, with a 95% increase since 1990, says Michael Graham Richard at Treehugger.
Treehugger
February 26, 2010, 11am PST
Long commute + High Fuel Costs = Home Losses in Exurbs.
Marketplace
February 19, 2010, 9am PST
Graphic designer Martha Kang McGill took commuting data from several American cities and made an easy-to-compare representation of the information using no more than a font and some colors.
The Infrastructurist
Blog post
January 15, 2010, 9am PST

Every so often, one sees an article arguing that one mode of transportation is cheaper, more efficient, or less dangerous than another because it uses less energy/kills more people/costs more per passenger-mile. (1)

It seems to me, however, that per passenger-mile comparisions are flawed in one key respect: they assume that trips on any mode of transportation will involve the same mileage, so that if the average driver lives 20 miles from work, the average bus rider will also live 20 miles from work.

Michael Lewyn
December 15, 2009, 7am PST
This chart from <em>The Economist</em> lists how frustrated international workers are with the commute times in their countries. The U.S. ranks surprisingly low.
The Economist
November 20, 2009, 12pm PST
One of the conclusions of a new study in the San Francisco Bay Area is that switching to electric and alternative fuel cars won't reduce the burden on households because ownership is the most significant expense. Thus, density is the only way out.
Streetsblog San Francisco