Carbon Sequestration

Research has shown that the world's largest land use, grazing, holds enormous potential when linked with composting, to dramatically reduce the carbon content of the atmosphere through sequestration while concurrently restoring degraded rangeland.
Oct 20, 2014   San Francisco Chronicle
Construction began July 16 on the Petra Nova project, 27 miles from Houston. President Obama and many climate experts are banking on CCS to mitigate carbon emissions from the world's largest source of carbon emissions: coal burning power plants.
Jul 22, 2014   Reuters
In order for new coal power plants to meet the EPA's new rules for reduced emissions, they will have to rely on unproven carbon capture and storage (or sequester) technologies, putting the legality of the rule in doubt.
Sep 24, 2013   The New York Times - Energy & Environment
Even as the world (unsuccessfully) tries to formulate a treaty to get nations to reduce their carbon emissions, researchers indicate it may be too late - the tipping point may have been reached. But what if CO2 could be extracted from the air?
Jan 8, 2013   The New York Times - Novelties
A Silicon Valley startup is proposing to turn carbon dioxide emissions from coal and gas power plants into cement that can be used for everyday construction.
Mar 24, 2010   ASLA's The Dirt blog
This piece from <em>Urban Omnibus</em> looks at ideas to counteract global warming by adding more trees to urban areas.
Jan 18, 2010   Urban Omnibus
A new report shows that green roofs not only help by cooling the sun's rays, they also are effective for carbon sequestration.
Dec 11, 2009   Miller-McCune
The Canadian government said that it will invest millions in the third carbon capture and storage project in Alberta.
Nov 25, 2009   The Wall Street Journal
GE is going to power the world's largest carbon capture and sequestration project for western Australia, in order to process natural gas from its Gorgon natural gas field.
Oct 23, 2009   Environment News Service
A proposed CCS site under an eastern German village has met serious opposition from locals who fear their crops and families will suffer. Scientists and the energy company say it's perfectly safe.
Oct 7, 2009   The Wall Street Journal
Scientists at the University of Michigan are studying ways to replant exurbs in order to capture more atmosphere-warming carbon dioxide.
Aug 27, 2008   Ann Arbor News