Electric Cars

You've heard of road rage. Electric vehicle drivers at Silicon Valley workplaces where EVs substantially exceed chargers may experience "charge rage" when a "top-off" can take as long as eight hours.
Jan 23, 2014   San Jose Mercury News
<em>The Infrastructurist</em> runs down the ten most important news stories and trends in the world of infrastructure in 2010.
Dec 29, 2010   The Infrastructurist
Chevy, Ford, and Nissan are all debuting electric models over the next year, but are Americans ready? Eric Jaffe considers why not.
Nov 16, 2010   The Infrastructurist
Next June, Paris will begin a test phase of a citywide electric car-sharing program.
Oct 11, 2010   Der Spiegel
With the support of Israel's government, Better Place is proposing a radical solution to the country's petrol problems and aiming to make the country the first to rid itself of dependence on oil for transportation.
Sep 19, 2010   The Financial Times
Electric cars sap a lot of electricity out of the grid, and many vehicles charging at once can cause unprepared cities to blackout.
Aug 27, 2010   Boston Herald
Maury Blackman of Accela writes that local governments will have a significant effect on whether electric cars take off or not, because they will be approving and building the necessary infrastructure.
Aug 14, 2010   Accela Corporate blog
Backed by funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Michigan has invested heavily in setting up factories to make batteries for electric vehicles like the Chevy Volt.
Aug 6, 2010   The New York Times
At $41,000 the new Chevrolet Volt is a "rich man's ride." Charles Lane asks why is President Obama offering federal tax credits of $7,500 to help better-off American's buy expensive cars?
Aug 2, 2010   Slate
Hawaii is an ideal test case for creating an electric car infrastructure because fuel costs are very high and distances are manageable. Charging stations are going up all over the islands with a goal of making it easy to envision driving an EV.
Jul 25, 2010   Governing Magazine
I was reading Wendell Cox's recent attack on the Center for Neighborhood Technology's affordability calculations, and was struck by one thing he wrote:"transportation costs will be reduced in the future by the far more fuel efficient vehicles being required by Washington."*  Opinion
Apr 26, 2010   By Michael Lewyn