Teardowns

July 10, 2016, 1pm PDT
Montreal will include one less elevated highway—so long Bonaventure Expressway.
Montreal Gazette
February 3, 2016, 8am PST
Lakeview, located north of Lincoln Park and adjacent to Lake Michigan, leads the city by a wide margin in residential teardowns over the past five years. Local developers are selling new homes for four times the original price paid.
Crain's Chicago Business
December 3, 2015, 12pm PST
Mansionization, that conspicuous manifestation of the demand for larger homes, is alive and well in Seattle.
The Seattle Times
October 22, 2015, 12pm PDT
According to an article by The Urbanist, some Seattle publications might have been caught telling people what they want to hear, rather than offering clear perspective on the building trends of the city.
The Urbanist
June 8, 2015, 6am PDT
According to this article, the market forces behind large home construction are alive and well. In a process of suburban gentrification, developers purchase older, smaller homes and build "McMansions" in their place.
Bloomberg
December 22, 2014, 8am PST
The city of Montreal announced final plans to tear down an elevated highway and replace it with an urban boulevard.
Montreal Gazette
November 2, 2014, 9am PST
Luxury condos are often identified as the culprit in urban gentrification, but could it be that teardowns of single family homes that give way to much larger single family homes is a driver of suburban gentrification?
Chicago Tribune
July 1, 2014, 7am PDT
Call them teardowns, infill, or McMansions, the affluent suburb of Decatur, Georgia is dealing with growing concern about neighborhood character and tree canopy as property owners adopt the trend toward new, large houses in existing neighborhoods.
Atlanta Creative Loafing
February 1, 2013, 11am PST
As cities across the country consider ways to limit teardowns and large home construction in established neighborhoods, Anthony Flint argues that communities should be flattered by "mansionization" and accommodating to this form of smart growth.
The Atlantic Cities
May 7, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>Despite concerns about lowering property values across the city, the L.A. City Council moved to limit the size of newly constructed homes in older neighborhoods to about 4,000 square feet.</p>
The Los Angeles Times
Blog post
April 17, 2007, 11am PDT

In my hometown—and yours, too, I'm sure—a small, one-story house was for sale, and then it was gone. The guy who bought it promptly tore it down and then, because the new house he had designed was too big for the site, let the hole sit there for a year, a broken tooth in the 1950s neighborhood. Of course, the house he built was still too big for the lot, but there it stands, three feet from his seething neighbors: a McMansion.

Margaret Foster