Streets

December 15, 2008, 8am PST
This piece from <em>Worldchanging</em> looks at recent efforts by cities to "reconquer" streets by making them (temporarily, at least) pedestrianized and closed off to car traffic.
WorldChanging
Blog post
October 23, 2008, 8am PDT

City streets need only few things to make them safe, according to the famous urbanist Jane Jacobs. She says safe streets need people walking around, places for them to go, things for them to do and other people for them to interact with. Simple as that. But Jane forgot one more thing: a sock full of quarters.

Nate Berg
October 1, 2008, 9am PDT
One of New York City's smallest and least-known streets is attracting the eyes of private developers, and the city seems keen to sell. But neighbors say the tiny street is worth preserving.
The New York Times
August 31, 2008, 7am PDT
American cities are increasingly making moves to reclaim their streets. In this column, Neal Peirce looks into the trend.
Citiwire
July 25, 2008, 2pm PDT
<p>Developers often see naming streets as their way of making a mark, naming streets after daughters, alma maters, or the family dog. But they often find themselves tangled up in regulations and the limits of their own creativity.</p>
The News & Observer
July 24, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>The rising value of iron and steel has prompted thieves to steal an alarming amount of manhole covers from Philadelphia's streets.</p>
The New York Times
July 22, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>New York City's car-free "Summer Streets" events are proving to be popular. A three-and-a-half minute video offers a look at Saturday's Williamsburg Walks event on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn.</p>
Streetsblog
June 23, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>This story from <em>NPR</em> looks at a new bike lane in New Orleans, and other efforts the city is taking to update its street infrastructure.</p>
NPR
May 25, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom is considering a plan to temporarily close down certain streets to car traffic, creating public space for pedestrians -- similar to the successful Ciclovia that takes place weekly in Bogota, Colombia.</p>
The Examiner
April 18, 2008, 7am PDT
<p>The German city of Bremen has lessons to teach North American cities about sustainable transportation, according to this article from <em>The Toronto Star</em>.</p>
The Toronto Star
April 9, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>Though congestion pricing was shot down, New Yorkers are thinking about new ways to experience and use their streets.</p>
The New York Times
Blog post
April 8, 2008, 7am PDT

American commercial streets are often designed almost exclusively for cars; streets are often as many as eight or ten lanes wide, lengthening pedestrian trips and encouraging motorists to drive at speeds unsafe for pedestrians.

Michael Lewyn
Blog post
April 4, 2008, 5pm PDT

Another week has passed, and some more exciting and interesting ideas have taken root in the world of urban planning.

Nate Berg
March 26, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>This piece from <em>The Tyee</em> offers ideas about how to recreate streets into lively public green spaces.</p>
The Tyee
Blog post
March 21, 2008, 5pm PDT
We all know there's a lot of planning going on around the world. Much of it is poor, short-sighted and generally just no good. But there are also some really great ideas being developed and adopted, and they should be considered by cities and communities all over the world as instructive examples of good planning. Here are what I think are some of the best ideas in urban planning from the last week.
Nate Berg
March 17, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>Officials in Miami-Dade County have just released their parks master plan, an ambitious proposal that looks to go beyond creating park space by redefining the region's public realm.</p>
The Miami Herald
March 17, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>Washington D.C. has begun to make key green parking reforms that will plow parking revenue into neighborhood bicycling and walking improvements.</p>
Streetsblog
March 4, 2008, 6am PST
<p>The machine-city envisioned by Le Corbusier, and made into practice in decades of modernist bureaucracy, has ultimately produced, according to Simon Richards' essay, an antisocial environment, against which urban planning seems to be now reacting.</p>
The Urban Reinventors Online Urban Journal
Blog post
April 13, 2007, 9pm PDT

(Prefatory musing: As the title implies, this is Part 1 in a series. I haven't yet mapped out any of the other parts, but considering the boundless errata that clutter American cities, I anticipate little trouble finding objectionables to raise my ire next time my monthly deadline approaches. I welcome my fellow Interchangers to follow suit.)

Josh Stephens
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