Streets

November 11, 2009, 2pm PST
A new report from Transportation for America reveals that over the past 15 years, 76,000 Americans have been killed while crossing or walking along a street in their community.
Transportation for America
October 10, 2009, 11am PDT
This article from <em>Wired UK</em> looks at a handful of emerging transportation concept technologies that are altering the form of the city.
Wired UK
October 8, 2009, 8am PDT
The American Planning Association has released its picks for Great Places in America for 2009, including their choices for Streets, Public Spaces and Neighborhoods. Skagway, Alaska's Broadway tops the list.
American Planning Association
September 16, 2009, 2pm PDT
<em>Suburban Nation</em> co-author Jeff Speck cracks the new New York Street Design Manual and finds a lot of useful material and some that falls short.
Design Observer
September 11, 2009, 7am PDT
San Francisco's notoriously congested Market Street will soon see a lighter load of traffic, as officials roll out a pilot project that will ban private vehicles from the roadway.
San Francisco Chronicle
September 4, 2009, 8am PDT
A new street greening project in North Portland that seeks to reduce stormwater runoff is fueling a debate between the area's young, eco-conscious businesses owners and older owners who are worried about interruption from the project.
The Oregonian
Feature
August 31, 2009, 9am PDT

Cities are taking charge when it comes to their streets. A number of big American cities have come out with manuals and toolkits to guide their design.

Amber Hawkes
August 12, 2009, 11am PDT
Hundreds marched in San Antonio, Texas, in defiance of new street procession fees that the organizations believe will stifle free speech.
San Antonio Express-News
Feature
August 10, 2009, 5am PDT
Amber Hawkes
Feature
July 23, 2009, 5am PDT
Streets aren't just for driving, and cities are starting to realize it. Amber Hawkes and Georgia Sheridan explain why street design matters and where we are today in terms of designing the "street space."
Amber Hawkes
July 9, 2009, 8am PDT
As oil prices rise, so does the cost of asphalt. Concrete, historically more expensive, is now becoming a viable cost competitor. Because of its lighter shade, its also been shown to contribute less to climate change.
The Infrastructurist
June 30, 2009, 6am PDT
While New York City is currently taking space away from automobiles and giving it to pedestrians and cyclists, the New York City of 100 years ago was doing exactly the opposite. And it was a popular idea.
The New York Times
June 8, 2009, 5am PDT
Starting June 6th, several streets in Brooklyn will be pedestrian- only.
STREETSBLOG.ORG
May 23, 2009, 11am PDT
States are hoping to use federal stimulus money to add technological advancements to their streets and highways to create "smart" roads.
Stateline
May 22, 2009, 5am PDT
As New York City prepares to pedestrianize Times Square, <em>New York Magazine</em> profiles Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, who they call "equal parts Jane Jacobs and Robert Moses."
New York Magazine
March 24, 2009, 9am PDT
Jeff Speck takes a walk in Oklahoma City and finds too-wide streets, too-low density and too much danger for pedestrians.
The Oklahoman
Feature
January 29, 2009, 5am PST
The Internet is a trove of great ideas about improving cities. Filling blogs and personal websites, the vast majority of ideas out there are little more than that: ideas. New York City's Streetsblog -- now a growing nationwide force -- is transforming the conversation into action.
Mike Lydon
January 25, 2009, 9am PST
Light reflecting from streets and glass buildings in cities have been found in a recent study to disrupt animal behavior.
BBC
December 17, 2008, 9am PST
DeSoto and Ferguson are the first two cities in Missouri to adopt Complete Street plans. The ordinances are in place to encourage walking and biking, and, ultimately, healthier lifestyles.
Land Online
December 17, 2008, 5am PST
<em>New York Magazine</em>'s list of reasons to love New York includes a nod to the city's streets and their recent renovation into pedestrian- and bike-friendly thoroughfares.
New York Magazine