The Atlantic

October 20, 2013, 11am PDT
Across the United States and around the world, groups of Roman Catholic nuns are quietly supporting a supposedly extra-religious cause: environmentalism.
The Atlantic
September 4, 2013, 11am PDT
When you think about poverty, do you picture the suburbs? New data suggests that you should.
The Atlantic
August 30, 2013, 7am PDT
Despite a deep recession driven by a housing bust, the National Alliance to End Homelessness estimates that homelessness dropped by 17 percent from 2005 to 2012. This is astonishing news, right? So why aren't politicians trumpeting this decline?
The Atlantic
July 2, 2013, 9am PDT
Within a few decades, explosive population growth in West Africa will create an urbanized area similar in size to America's eastern seaboard between Boston and D.C., "only far more populous." At one pole is Lagos, a "powerful new city-state."
The Atlantic
June 20, 2013, 10am PDT
While the decline may not be visible, total auto ownership peaked in 2008 according to a new report by Michael Sivak of the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute. He set out to determine the cause - was it the economic recession?
The Atlantic
May 29, 2013, 8am PDT
Planning a trip to Bangkok this year? If so, you're not alone. The Thai capital tops MasterCard's new ranking of the world's most visited cities, with nearly 16 million tourists expected to see the city this year.
The Atlantic
May 22, 2013, 12pm PDT
You might be surprised to learn that in the area famously known as 'Tornado Alley', underground shelters and safe rooms are relatively rare. Several reasons, from physical to financial to cultural constraints, conspire to leave residents vulnerable.
The Atlantic
May 2, 2013, 11am PDT
A private collection of 38,000 historical maps has been added to the Digital Public Library of America, reports Rebecca Rosen, making it more accessible to researchers and anyone interested in the history of their community.
The Atlantic
March 7, 2013, 1pm PST
When electricity was still in its infancy, municipal leaders turned to "moonlight towers" to provide mass illumination for their cities. Megan Garber explores the "brief and literally shining moment" in the history of electric streetlights.
The Atlantic
January 6, 2013, 11am PST
As this video from The Perennial Plate, a web series about sustainable food, demonstrates, rooftop gardening is becoming a global phenomenon.
The Atlantic
December 1, 2012, 11am PST
Derek Thompson discusses the findings of a new study from the Brookings Institution that ranks the world's 300 biggest cities by GDP and job growth over the past year. Put simply, China is growing and Europe is slowing.
The Atlantic
November 28, 2012, 12pm PST
Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley tour the "otherwise nondescript brick building" on San Francisco's Mason Street that houses the machines running the "Endless Wire Ropeway" that hums beneath the city's streets and pulls its famous cable cars.
The Atlantic
November 1, 2012, 1pm PDT
Extreme events tend to expose the true weaknesses and strengths of a place and its people. In the same way that Sandy revealed the shortcomings in NY's physical infrastructure, it has shown the growing chasm in the city's economic infrastructure.
The Atlantic
October 5, 2012, 2pm PDT
The Hubble Space Telescope has been busy for the past decade. After looking at the same spot in the sky for a total of 2 million seconds it has produced what NASA calls the "farthest-ever" portrait of the universe, reports Rebecca J. Rosen.
The Atlantic
September 13, 2012, 1pm PDT
Scientists have created <em>sounds</em> from air pollution data that allow listeners to hear the striking differences and similarities between the air we breathe in America's most polluted city and remote pine forests.
The Atlantic
September 7, 2012, 12pm PDT
Alexis C. Madrigal get exclusive access to "Ground Truth," Google's project to develop the most accurate maps in the world. But why is the master of the virtual world so intent on documenting the physical world?
The Atlantic
August 17, 2012, 2pm PDT
You may have heard of the Central Asian country of Kazakhstan for the "enlightened authoritarianism" of President Nursultan Nazarbayev, or as the world's largest landlocked country. It's now earning a well-deserved reputation for its parking habits.
The Atlantic
August 16, 2012, 11am PDT
The love affair between Americans and their cars is a well known trope. But according to a new paper from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace on worldwide car usage, America's car ownership rate is among the lowest in the developed world.
The Atlantic
July 25, 2012, 2pm PDT
As the 2012 Summer Olympics begin in earnest today with the first Women's Soccer games, Andrew Zimbalist offers 3 reasons why "hosting the Olympics is a losers game."
The Atlantic
July 2, 2012, 7am PDT
A device invented to cool factories changed where and how our cities formed.
The Atlantic