NPR

April 30, 2013, 9am PDT
A new exhibit explores the role that tile masons Rafael Guastavino (father and son) played in embellishing many of America's greatest landmarks of the last century. Grand Central Terminal, Carnegie Hall, and the NY subway all exhibit their work.
NPR
March 19, 2013, 5am PDT
The resurgence of farmers markets across America has helped feed the growing desire for locally grown produce. Unfortunately, the return on investment still doesn't pencil out for many farmers.
NPR
March 14, 2013, 12pm PDT
The USDA's new Food Access Research Atlas provides a handy guide for assisting policymakers and planners in finding the urban and rural areas with the most formidable obstacles to accessing fresh healthy food, reports Nancy Shute.
NPR
February 17, 2013, 9am PST
As the destructive force of Hurricane Sandy demonstrated, all sand dunes are not created equal. But as coastal communities start to rebuild their defenses for the next storm, they're trying to close the gap with Mother Nature.
NPR
January 13, 2013, 5am PST
In Chicago, like in many cities, local food production comes in many forms, from small backyard crops to community gardens. Researchers are now using Google Earth to paint a more accurate picture of food production at different scales.
NPR
December 20, 2012, 7am PST
Air travel is a notoriously wasteful mode. But one airport is taking huge leaps towards sustainability. Julie Rose reports on Charlotte Douglas International's comprehensive recycling and composting program.
NPR
December 14, 2012, 2pm PST
You know what they say about not being able to turn away from an accident? Well what about 13 minutes of accidents? We can't help but laugh at some of the insane (and frightening) driving on display in this compilation of Russian accident videos.
NPR
September 19, 2012, 1pm PDT
In New York, occupational cliches such as the Irish policeman, or more recently, the Pakistani cab driver, have existed for generations. NPR looks at one current niche - Senegalese sidewalk vendors - to trace how such associations are established.
NPR
September 17, 2012, 12pm PDT
Traditions must die hard in Detroit, where the region can't seem to shake its enduring geographic and racial divisions, reports Sarah Hulett.
NPR
September 15, 2012, 9am PDT
A project by French artist Armelle Caron looks at what happens when you take the patterns of blocks that make up a city's form and organize and stack them sideways. Robert Krulwich investigates what such an exercise reveals about a city.
NPR
September 14, 2012, 8am PDT
New research conducted by the CDC in Atlanta is aimed at understanding just how prevalent exposure to dangerous levels of highway noise is. Such exposure can play a detrimental role in one's health.
NPR
September 12, 2012, 5am PDT
Cities consistently experience higher temperatures than the surrounding countryside due to the 'heat island' effect. With global warming exacerbating these effects, cities are trying to lower local contributors to urban heat.
NPR
September 9, 2012, 11am PDT
After years wasted trying to implement large-scale redevelopment of its formerly industrial waterfront, Buffalo is cleaning up its shores from the ground up, reports Daniel Robison.
NPR
September 7, 2012, 6am PDT
More often than not, innovation springs from social interaction, rather than the romantic notion of the genius in isolation. With this in mind, Jessica Stoller-Conrad and Nancy Shute discuss three important ways in which geography fuels innovation.
NPR
September 4, 2012, 6am PDT
Urban gardening is sprouting to life across America, but urban locales in the developing world "have incorporated horticulture into their urban planning" for decades. In Africa, urbanization is threatening these essential parts of the food system.
NPR
August 30, 2012, 10am PDT
The rapid development of Miami's Brickell neighborhood has left many residents without proper access to open space, a circumstance some are trying to remedy, despite astronomical land costs.
NPR
August 22, 2012, 12pm PDT
Astrophysicist Adam Frank takes a bird's eye view of the beautiful and perilous ways in which cities - "the defining element of human civilization" - exhibit the laws of thermodynamics.
NPR
August 22, 2012, 8am PDT
Citing a "near-term risk" of rising tides, city planners in Boston are grappling with how to prepare residents and businesses for the effects of climate change, reports Monica Brady-Myerov.
NPR
August 21, 2012, 6am PDT
A new study breaks down charitable giving by zip code, revealing the great variety in donations by area and economic group. Pam Fessler shares the results.
NPR
August 17, 2012, 8am PDT
Already the hottest major American city, Peter O'Dowd describes how planners in Phoenix are preparing for the increased sizzle brought on by global warming.
NPR