NPR

July 6, 2014 marks the one-year anniversary of North America's most catastrophic energy calamity when a runaway oil unit train carrying Bakken crude exploded in this small Quebec town killing 47 people and incinerating ten blocks of its downtown.
Jul 6, 2014   NPR
A new exhibit explores the role that tile masons Rafael Guastavino (father and son) played in embellishing many of America's greatest landmarks of the last century. Grand Central Terminal, Carnegie Hall, and the NY subway all exhibit their work.
Apr 30, 2013   NPR
The resurgence of farmers markets across America has helped feed the growing desire for locally grown produce. Unfortunately, the return on investment still doesn't pencil out for many farmers.
Mar 19, 2013   NPR
The USDA's new Food Access Research Atlas provides a handy guide for assisting policymakers and planners in finding the urban and rural areas with the most formidable obstacles to accessing fresh healthy food, reports Nancy Shute.
Mar 14, 2013   NPR
As the destructive force of Hurricane Sandy demonstrated, all sand dunes are not created equal. But as coastal communities start to rebuild their defenses for the next storm, they're trying to close the gap with Mother Nature.
Feb 17, 2013   NPR
In Chicago, like in many cities, local food production comes in many forms, from small backyard crops to community gardens. Researchers are now using Google Earth to paint a more accurate picture of food production at different scales.
Jan 13, 2013   NPR
Air travel is a notoriously wasteful mode. But one airport is taking huge leaps towards sustainability. Julie Rose reports on Charlotte Douglas International's comprehensive recycling and composting program.
Dec 20, 2012   NPR
You know what they say about not being able to turn away from an accident? Well what about 13 minutes of accidents? We can't help but laugh at some of the insane (and frightening) driving on display in this compilation of Russian accident videos.
Dec 14, 2012   NPR
In New York, occupational cliches such as the Irish policeman, or more recently, the Pakistani cab driver, have existed for generations. NPR looks at one current niche - Senegalese sidewalk vendors - to trace how such associations are established.
Sep 19, 2012   NPR
Traditions must die hard in Detroit, where the region can't seem to shake its enduring geographic and racial divisions, reports Sarah Hulett.
Sep 17, 2012   NPR
A project by French artist Armelle Caron looks at what happens when you take the patterns of blocks that make up a city's form and organize and stack them sideways. Robert Krulwich investigates what such an exercise reveals about a city.
Sep 15, 2012   NPR