NPR

April 30, 2016, 5am PDT
Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx sees rebuilding America's ailing infrastructure as an opportunity to "right past wrongs," particularly with 1950s and 1960s-era freeways that bisected communities. NPR and Streetsblog describe the new initiative.
NPR
April 23, 2016, 5am PDT
On Earth Day, NPR looked at the intersection of the Paris Climate Agreement, which Secretary of State John Kerry signed at the U.N. on Friday, and President Obama's Clean Power Plan which has been given a pause by the Supreme Court.
NPR
February 23, 2016, 6am PST
Research conducted in Flint, Michigan, found that changing the location of the local farmers' market had a dramatic effect in how residents shopped.
NPR
February 14, 2016, 7am PST
It's not just millennials anymore. A new study finds more people are going without driver's licenses than in previous decades.
NPR
January 22, 2016, 9am PST
Reporting from the world's most polluted capital, Julie McCarthy speaks with Ari Shapiro on NPR's "All Things Considered." McCarthy talks glowingly about how successful the two-week trial went in reducing pollution and congestion even more so.
NPR
January 17, 2016, 1pm PST
GE is abandoning its 68-acre suburban campus in Fairfield, Conn. for Boston's Seaport District. As WBUR's technology reporter, Curt Nickisch put it, "Today's knowledge workers want bike racks and subway stops not country clubs and parking garages."
NPR
August 22, 2015, 11am PDT
Parts of the nation's food basket, the San Joaquin Valley in California, are sinking at two inches per month, not per year. Known as subsidence, it results from over-pumping of groundwater by farmers desperate to save their crops in the epic drought.
NPR
June 6, 2015, 1pm PDT
According to a new EPA draft assessment, fracking has not caused pollution of drinking water, though concerns are raised. The report has yet to be reviewed by the Science Advisory Board and is now receiving public comment.
NPR
May 13, 2015, 2pm PDT
Evidence is building up that the Brazil's extravagant spending on the World Cup soccer championships last year won’t have the last positive impacts promised by government officials. Next up for Brazil: the Olympics.
NPR
April 15, 2015, 10am PDT
While rates of homelessness drop elsewhere, tents and cardboard are becoming a very regular sight in Seattle. New wealth and newly unaffordable housing may be twin culprits.
NPR
March 6, 2015, 8am PST
The Wall Street Journal's senior energy reporter, Russell Gold, is interviewed on NPR about the February 16 derailment and explosion in West Virginia of an oil-train hauling 109 tanker cars of Bakken crude from North Dakota.
NPR
February 16, 2015, 5am PST
In two parts, NPR's City Project examines Austin's premier mixed-use urban village built on the 700-acre site of the former Robert Mueller Municipal Airport which relocated in 1999. Part 2 is about racial tensions that have surfaced in the community.
NPR
February 13, 2015, 5am PST
NPR reports on the incipient movement among a dozen states considering raising gas taxes. It centers on New Jersey which arguably illustrates best the need to raise gas taxes to maintain roads and bridges, but it won't be easy, as the interviews show
NPR
January 10, 2015, 1pm PST
Linda Poon shares news of a short documentary about a Chinese artist trying to "bring economic and cultural development to a village struggling to survive China's rapid urbanization."
NPR
December 12, 2014, 10am PST
While there may never be a good time to increase the federal gas tax, the same is not true when it comes to state gas taxes—perhaps because governors can't transfer billions of dollars from general funds to pay for roads. Lower gas prices helps.
NPR
November 12, 2014, 12pm PST
A surprise, groundbreaking agreement between China and the United States was unveiled in Beijing at the end of the APEC conference, providing hope that the world can reduce the threat from climate change.
NPR
November 3, 2014, 9am PST
The country's aging water infrastructure is growing more wasteful and expensive to fix with every year. What will it take to re-engineer our drinking water supplies?
NPR
October 16, 2014, 10am PDT
The worthy foe is not environmental regulations nor the the government or public demanding fracking moratoriums and bans. It is the falling global price of oil. Two radio reports explore how the global glut of oil affects U.S. shale oil production.
NPR
October 14, 2014, 10am PDT
In its ongoing series on millennials, NPR visits a three-generation family; all are environmentally-oriented, but the youngest refuses to label herself as an environmentalist even though she got upset when her boyfriend's family did not compost.
NPR
September 12, 2014, 6am PDT
A new application, "Playgrounds for Everyone," has a growing database of 2505 inclusive and accessible playgrounds around the country suitable for children with special needs.
NPR