The Architect's Newspaper

March 26, 2013, 5am PDT
The conversion of an historic art deco baseball stadium in Indianapolis into loft apartments is one of the most inventive adaptive re-use projects we've ever seen.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 13, 2013, 5am PDT
Should architects recuse themselves from designing buildings that violate human rights? Raphael Sperry says yes, especially when it comes to two building types that are ethically troublesome: execution chambers and supermax prisons.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 5, 2013, 5am PST
Alan G. Brake outlines the redesigned plans to develop the site of the historic Domino Sugar refinery along Brooklyn's East River waterfront. The $1.5 billion plan is the latest, and perhaps last, turn in the site's tortured redevelopment saga.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 28, 2013, 1pm PST
James Brasuell discusses the contentious proposal to adopt citywide design guidelines for use by L.A.'s City Council. While the guidelines are intended to raise the level of design throughout the city, some argue they will stifle good design.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 19, 2013, 1pm PST
L.A. stands at a critical juncture in the city's development, with an opportunity to embrace new patterns of land use that break with its postwar history. To seize this opportunity, the city will have to build incrementally, argues Peter Zellner.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 8, 2013, 11am PST
“More Park, Less Way” is the title of a new plan to revitalize Philadelphia's Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which was fashioned after Paris's famous boulevard but falls short by almost any measure, including its unwelcoming pedestrian environment.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 7, 2013, 10am PST
While New York has benefited over the past decade from the design leadership of Michael Bloomberg, Amanda Burden, and Janette Sadik-Khan, Los Angeles sorely lacks such powerful champions. Sam Lubell asks who will step up for L.A.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 6, 2013, 9am PST
With the opening last weekend of the city's first pilot parklet in the neighborhood of Eagle Rock, Los Angeles is hoping to join the ranks of cities hopping on the low-cost trend in public space creation.
The Architect's Newspaper
January 25, 2013, 1pm PST
Although the nation's housing market appears to be improving, the foreclosure crisis is far from over. Following in the footsteps of other localities, Cook County, Illinois, is creating a countywide land bank to help address its foreclosures.
The Architect's Newspaper
January 18, 2013, 10am PST
The EPA has released plans for how it intends to clean up Brooklyn's Gowanus Canal Superfund site. Branden Klayko reports on the $500 million, two pronged approach.
The Architect's Newspaper
January 15, 2013, 11am PST
Town Branch Creek was once the lifeblood of Lexington, Kentucky. Now, more than a century after it was rerouted and buried, city leaders want to resurrect the historic waterway as the focal point of downtown redevelopment.
The Architect's Newspaper
January 8, 2013, 1pm PST
Alan G. Brake looks at the ambitions of Dallas's newly opened Klyde Warren Park. Built atop a trenched highway, the park "attempts to merge sophisticated contemporary design with walkable urbanism" while uniting two downtown neighborhoods.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 16, 2012, 7am PST
Nicole Anderson discusses plans to create a "funderpass" to "ameliorate the awkward neighborhood divisions caused by the BQE." Are a catchy name and new amenities enough to mend the tear in the city fabric caused by the elevated expressway?
The Architect's Newspaper
December 13, 2012, 6am PST
Boston has seen an increase of new construction over the past few years, mostly concentrated along the waterfront and its "Innovation District." The Architect's Newspaper has compiled a list of the most high-profile developments in the city.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 5, 2012, 6am PST
Landscape Architecture is a field in the ascendency, writes Alan G. Brake. Its rise can be traced to the inability of Architects and Planners to engage with some of the most important challenges of our time.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 2, 2012, 7am PST
Planning a trip to NYC over the holidays? In a recent editorial, William Menking argues that “for visitors to New York, the place to look for the most exciting architectural ideas is not the city streets, but the walls of galleries and museums.”
The Architect's Newspaper
November 25, 2012, 9am PST
The New York City Housing Authority is facing scrutiny after residents went almost a month without power, Nicole Anderson reports.
The Architect's Newspaper
October 29, 2012, 7am PDT
Joining a host of other Midwestern cities establishing land banks to help corral, clear, and repurpose their vacant properties, Kansas City will begin transferring 3,500 vacant properties it recently acquired into a city-owned land bank.
The Architect's Newspaper
October 24, 2012, 12pm PDT
Now that Mayor Bloomberg has had his say in what New Yorkers drink, Alan Brake argues it's time for the next mayor and his partner in Albany to focus on what they eat, by devising a plan to link New York's upstate farms with its downstate markets.
The Architect's Newspaper
October 23, 2012, 11am PDT
As part of an endeavor to improve access to New York's 525 Privately Owned Public Spaces (POPS), which gained notoriety during last year's Occupy Wall Street protests, a new website has been launched to help the public find and utilize them.
The Architect's Newspaper