The Architect's Newspaper

April 24, 2011, 7am PDT
A new project is opening in San Francisco that utilizes a vacant piece of land for a temporary retail installation using shipping containers.
The Architect's Newspaper
April 19, 2011, 2pm PDT
The plans for the newly-opened Brooklyn Bridge Park included a 150-room hotel and two 30-story to 40-story condos buildings, which planners say were necessary to make the project pencil out. As construction nears, some locals are upset at the plans.
The Architect's Newspaper
April 5, 2011, 5am PDT
In this Q&A, architect Brenda Levin talks about the role of preservation in Los Angeles, and how restoring and reusing some of the city's historic buildings has created a long-term benefit.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 30, 2011, 7am PDT
As green spaces and public areas increase in demand, more and more projects are being awarded to landscape architects rather than architects, some foresee a potential professional turf war.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 25, 2011, 2pm PDT
At the 210-acre Peddocks Island in Boston Harbor Island State Park, two different visions prevail over preserving -- or destroying -- the 26 historic buildings on the island.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 22, 2011, 2pm PDT
The recent adoption of a citywide bicycle plan in Los Angeles could bring about broad changes to the city's physical environment.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 16, 2011, 2pm PDT
TIME Magazine called Toni Griffin a "star urban planner" as she was hired in March of 2010 to head up the downsizing of Detroit. But as The Architect's Newspaper reports, one year later Griffin is mysteriously AWOL.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 16, 2011, 8am PDT
Kansas City's Plan Commission has denied a 55-acre redevelopment centered around a downtown plaza - a project that had the approval of the Planning Dept. and the local AIA Chapter, but evidently not the community.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 2, 2011, 9am PST
A landscape urbanism biennale in an unlikely suburb of Tel Aviv offers its working class citizens a look how their city can change for the better.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 28, 2011, 10am PST
Angela Starita reports on the growing popularity of "haute food courts" -- high-end food markets -- and what they mean for cities.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 14, 2011, 10am PST
Communities in the slums of India are well known for "making do". A new exhibit looks at how that spirit of innovation and adaptation plays out in these cities and how other cities can learn from them.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 7, 2011, 6am PST
The Architect's Newspaper explores the "fertile new approaches to building" springing from the growing use of landscaping in contemporary architecture.
The Architect's Newspaper
January 25, 2011, 8am PST
Building owners in downtown Chicago are hoping to push forward a project aimed at creating a "smart grid" of energy-efficient and energy-producing buildings.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 21, 2010, 8am PST
A Kansas City design team hopes its model for a prefabricated village can bring "simple, high-quality vernacular architecture" to the country's rural communities.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 16, 2010, 8am PST
A proposal to redevelop an abandoned rail embankment in Jersey City has pitted preservationists and smart growth proponents against each other.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 12, 2010, 11am PST
Los Angeles is ugly. But it doesn't have to be, argues Sam Lubell.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 9, 2010, 2pm PST
The Redwood City Saltworks development designed by Peter Calthorpe has taken a lot of flack from environmentalists -- and rightfully so, says John Parman, in particular for its susceptibility to potentially rising bay waters from global warming.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 2, 2010, 9am PST
After 25 years in conception and a recently renewed master planning effort, the 150-acre Piggyback Yards still awaits funding and approval from the city, reports The Architect's Newspaper.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 2, 2010, 7am PST
Since reunification in 1989, many East German cities have been devastated by failing economies and population loss. The Germans, therefore, have a leg up on management strategies for failing cities. Doreen Ritzau takes a tour.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 2, 2010, 5am PST
The city's Department of Transportation recently announced plans to expand its successful Manhattan pilot program to all five boroughs.
The Architect's Newspaper