The Architect's Newspaper

3 days ago
The title of tallest building west of the Mississippi, property of the U.S. Bank Tower in Los Angeles since 1989, will soon go to another building. What does that say about the post-recession of West Coast cities?
The Architect's Newspaper
June 17, 2016, 8am PDT
Inside big redevelopment plans for Brush Park in Detroit—one of the neighborhoods attracting investment attention from Dan Gilbert.
The Architect's Newspaper
June 12, 2016, 7am PDT
The Architect's Newspaper reports on the potentially outsized implications of a recent decision by the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission.
The Architect's Newspaper
May 11, 2016, 8am PDT
The Architect's Newspaper surveys the development scene in Downtown Milwaukee—an that remained quiet for 20-some years is now expecting four new high rises before 2020.
The Architect's Newspaper
April 24, 2016, 5am PDT
A $50 million project will replace the now demolished inverted pyramid pier off the coast of St. Petersburg.
The Architect's Newspaper
April 20, 2016, 7am PDT
The first museum to have a "sustained department of architecture and design" is closing down its architecture and design galleries.
The Architect's Newspaper
April 15, 2016, 2pm PDT
The American Institute of Architects recently announced the winners of the 2016 Housing Awards.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 23, 2016, 1pm PDT
Tiny homes have captured new attention as a potential response to the homelessness and housing supply limitations gripping many U.S. cities. An AIA Chicago design competition recently called on architects to design new prototypes of the tiny home.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 7, 2016, 12pm PST
In a city looking to land use regulations for answers to an affordable housing crisis, one collection of community groups attempted to create a plan of their own.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 7, 2016, 8am PST
An amateur archaeologist has taken modern technology to dig into history, unearthing the roads built by Romans over 2,000 years ago in England.
The Architect's Newspaper
March 1, 2016, 2pm PST
Arup released some very exciting renderings of a proposed pedestrian and bike path on one of the most picturesque and heavily-trafficked spans on the West Coast.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 21, 2016, 9am PST
Looking for a greater awareness of social responsibility, the founder and editor-in-chief of The Architect's Newspaper calls for a new organization tasked with advocacy in New York City.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 15, 2016, 5am PST
The number of commuters taking to bicycle in the city have tripled since 2000, while commuting by car has been cut in half.
The Architect's Newspaper
February 12, 2016, 2pm PST
An online video game has the perfect remedy for anyone who hates modernism—and Le Corbusier more specifically.
The Architect's Newspaper
January 21, 2016, 10am PST
Architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne describes an L.A. in flux, at once beholden to its postwar image and pushing in a new direction. The city, he says, faces existential questions on a scale unmatched elsewhere in the nation.
The Architect's Newspaper
December 20, 2015, 11am PST
A historic corner of Louisville is getting a makeover as a cultural district for the 21st century. The $28 million already has preliminary approval for $7.2 million state tourism tax credits.
The Architect's Newspaper
November 17, 2015, 6am PST
In advance of what may be a wider program, Philadelphia's alleys have been ranked for their aesthetic quality. Those in the "average" range are most suitable for retrofits.
The Architect's Newspaper
November 10, 2015, 6am PST
In a field that seems divided between aesthetes and the activists, landscape architects may be closest to reconciling the two trends.
The Architect's Newspaper
October 25, 2015, 9am PDT
The hoopla has subsided surrounding nearly $1 billion awarded by HUD to fund coastal resilience projects on the Atlantic Coast, but the work of implementing the winning Rebuild by Design projects has continued.
The Architect's Newspaper
October 19, 2015, 12pm PDT
Camden, New Jersey, is not known for its skyscrapers, but that could change if the development of a site just south of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge is approved.
The Architect's Newspaper