Grist

April 22, 2012, 9am PDT
Greg Hanscom, senior editor at Grist, speaks with Denis Hayes, who coordinated the first Earth Day in 1970, when he was 25, about the big day, green building, and his prognosis for the planet.
Grist
April 17, 2012, 2pm PDT
Rebecca Messner looks at the groundbreaking work being done by the present generation of landscape architects, and wonders why the only one most people can name died more than a century ago.
Grist
April 5, 2012, 9am PDT
Claire Thompson profiles Neighborland, an online urban planning platform that aims to promote organic conversations that can build momentum and facilitate connections around improvement projects.
Grist
April 3, 2012, 1pm PDT
Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson reports on Open Walls Baltimore, the city’s first officially sanctioned street art exhibition, which seeks to bring new life to a transitional neighborhood, and presents a dilemma for its curator.
Grist
March 30, 2012, 10am PDT
Sarah Goodyear discovers a project to help Brooklynites reclaim land owned by the city, but long since abandoned, and building neighborhood bonds in the process.
Grist
March 19, 2012, 1pm PDT
Greg Hanscom reports on efforts by FEMA and the Green Building Council to incorporate "climate resiliency" into green building certification criteria in recognition of the increasing effects of climate change.
Grist
March 12, 2012, 8am PDT
<em>Grist</em> has asked its readers to help it compile some of the country's "most craptastic urban rebranding efforts ever." And boy have they delivered.
Grist
February 21, 2012, 6am PST
Claire Thompson reports on new findings presented in the Alliance for Biking and Walking's 2012 Benchmarking Report demonstrating the rise in biking and walking, and the incongruity with recent attempts to defund bipedal infrastructure.
Grist
February 17, 2012, 8am PST
Christopher Mims reports on L. Brooks Patterson, county executive of Oakland County, Michigan, who is perhaps the country's most vocal advocate of sprawl.
Grist
February 7, 2012, 7am PST
Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson raises the issue that there are not enough minorities representing the communities that planners and designers strive to make better.
Grist
January 31, 2012, 1pm PST
Christine Grant was fortunate enough to win a fellowship that allowed her to spend six months in the world's most bike-friendly cities. In this article she shares with us the 10 essential lessons she learned along the way.
Grist
January 19, 2012, 11am PST
Writing in <em>Grist</em>, Greg Hanscom's position is that under Obama's guidance, the Federal Government has shifted away from subsidizing sprawl and towards reviving cities. Agree?
Grist
January 16, 2012, 12pm PST
Long Beach is leading California's bicycle revolution in many ways, perhaps most creatively in establishing bike-friendly shopping districts.
Grist
December 21, 2011, 2pm PST
Greg Hanscom, cities editor at Grist, picks his top stories for 2011, including Occupy Wall Street, bright flight and the "urban renaissance that isn't (yet)."
Grist
December 17, 2011, 9am PST
Writing in Grist, Chuck Wolfe provides a counterintuitive look at what to do about potholes and how they could become "the universal darlings of walkable urbanism".
Grist
December 2, 2011, 7am PST
Walmart talks big about climate action, but its land-use strategy is anything but climate-friendly: It builds massive new stores on virgin land in sprawling areas, then abandons them in favor of still newer, still bigger stores, says Stacy Mitchell.
Grist
November 21, 2011, 5am PST
Grist profiles Dylan House, a Brooklyn architect and "change agent" that is involving underserved community groups in charrettes to plan their urban spaces.
Grist
November 18, 2011, 2pm PST
Proliferating faster than bike lanes or bike parking racks may be the chevron symbols in the pavement with bicycle icon informing cyclists and motorists alike to "share the road". But can too many sharrows be a bad thing, asks Grist's Elly Blue.
Grist
November 5, 2011, 11am PDT
Grist profiles a British street artist who specializes in creating images on dirty urban spaces (like tunnel walls) by simply washing away the grime.
Grist
October 18, 2011, 5am PDT
Greg Hanscom at Grist asks, if, as polls say, so many Millennials want to live in the city, why is the downtown resurgence a trickle rather than a flood?
Grist