The Guardian

Called by some the "third industrial revolution," what are some of the opportunities and costs of applying 3D printing to issues facing the developing world, and more importantly, emergency housing?
Aug 6, 2014   The Guardian
Jonathan Watts reports on the transformation of the Vidigal favela in Rio de Janeiro. With drug gangs kicked out, wealthy buyers have moved in, and rental prices have surged. But has the neighborhood changed for the better?
Jan 25, 2013   The Guardian
Although Britain's sporting successes make it out to be a nation of cyclists, only 2.2% of Britons use a bike as their main mode of transportation. Peter Walker looks at how a pioneering parliamentary inquiry hopes to get more people on bikes.
Jan 23, 2013   The Guardian
Despite their more traditional, mixed-use development patterns, the UK's town centers are not immune from declining "high streets" as a result of the poor economy, and the attractions of shopping centers and online retail. How can they fight back?
Jan 11, 2013   The Guardian
Dave Hill reflects on the history and outlook for the world's first underground train. He beckons Londoners to do the same, and to contemplate on how to best help the London Underground flourish in the future.
Jan 7, 2013   The Guardian
China is moving mountains again, but this time it isn't a legendary peasant doing the moving, but instead, Yan Jiehe, former teacher, big time developer and one of China's richest men, who is behind it all.
Dec 23, 2012   The Guardian
It doesn't traverse a deep gorge or curve around a mountainside, so what makes the N2 in Bangladesh one of the world's deadliest highways? Annie Kelly explains.
Dec 19, 2012   The Guardian
The U.S. Department of the Interior has cleared the way for what could become the first offshore wind projects in the country. Next year, lease sales will be offered on 278,00 acres of land off the coasts of Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Virginia.
Dec 4, 2012   The Guardian
"There is no nice way of putting this, but the skyline of London is being screwed," says Guardian architecture critic Rowan Moore. In an approvals process that runs roughshod over the concerns of the public, only developer egos are being served.
Dec 3, 2012   The Guardian
As Britain confronts the silent epidemic of inactivity and obesity, Peter Walker examines how the invisible dangers of a sedentary lifestyle are compared to the more publicized risk of injury from activities designed to get people moving.
Nov 30, 2012   The Guardian
Under the Kyoto Protocol, developed countries set targets for cutting carbon emissions relative to 1990 levels by 2012. As the globe gathers to discuss extending the expiring agreement, Duncan Clark examines its effectiveness.
Nov 27, 2012   The Guardian