The New Republic

October 19, 2010, 11am PDT
Christopher Leinberger argues that regardless of current coping strategies, the mortgage crisis is permanently reshaping cities and their edges.
The New Republic
October 9, 2010, 7am PDT
<em>The New Republic</em> offers a look and review of some of the nation's best new urban parks.
The New Republic
August 28, 2010, 5am PDT
The Brookings Institution's Robert Puentes reports back on a recent discussion about Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's 30/10 plan -- the idea to cram 30 years worth of transit investments into 10.
The New Republic
April 24, 2010, 7am PDT
This post from <em>The New Republic</em> explains how the federal budget includes plans to upgrade some of the varied parts that track statistics in the country.
The New Republic
April 8, 2010, 5am PDT
The federal government recently rejected a proposal by the state of Pennsylvania to toll Interstate 80. Robert Puentes argues that the decision is exactly what's holding metropolitan areas back from solving their transportation problems.
The New Republic
February 22, 2010, 6am PST
Metropolitan officials in the Sun Corridor of Arizona are increasingly working together to form a self-organized super-region, according to this analysis.
The New Republic
February 21, 2010, 7am PST
Metropolitan region's make up a major part of the U.S. in terms of population and economic activity. Accordingly, the Brookings Institution was surprised to see how little of the government's first year stimulus package went to those areas.
The New Republic
January 28, 2010, 7am PST
The housing market -- and especially the exurban housing market -- played a major role in bringing about the current economic recession, according to this piece from Christopher Leinberger. He says sprawl is unlikely to regain its lost value.
The New Republic
January 15, 2010, 9am PST
Detroit can come back using the model of European countries that downsized and densified, restructured their industries and created incubators for innovation, say Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley of Brookings.
The New Republic
December 17, 2009, 6am PST
This piece from <em>The New Republic</em> looks at the "urban disaster" of Detroit and compares it to other cities that have come on tough times in the past. Cities like Belfast and Turin offer examples of how Detroit can come back from the dead.
The New Republic
November 14, 2009, 9am PST
Undercounting is likely one of the biggest challenges facing the U.S. Census Bureau as it prepares to run its decennial census in April. Certain parts of the country will prove problematic when it comes time to count.
The New Republic
August 28, 2009, 5am PDT
Significant interest and investment has descended on a plan to create vast solar power plants in the Sahara Desert to power Europe, but the challenges are great, says Reuters.
The New Republic
July 7, 2009, 10am PDT
Some have grumbled at the Obama Administration's recently-announced standards for light bulbs. But changing industry standards for lighting would have no small effect, says Mark Muro of Brookings.
The New Republic
August 1, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>Author Alan Ehrenhalt says that conditions are ripe for the permanent return of downtown residential neighborhoods, and that a "demographic inversion" has already begun in Manhattan, Chicago and Washington, DC, among other cities.</p>
The New Republic
March 12, 2006, 5am PST
A new book ponders the state of the Everglades after decades of urban encroachment, and how we may restore them to their natural splendor.
The New Republic
September 23, 2005, 7am PDT
New Orleans can learn a lot from the flood rebuilding of Grand Forks in 1997.
The New Republic
June 16, 2005, 8am PDT
The housing boom is likely to last. That's the good news...and the bad news.
The New Republic
May 26, 2005, 7am PDT
The idea that American cities have made a comeback has been uncritically embraced. Unfortunately, cities aren't doing as well as we think they are, writes Joel Kotkin.
The New Republic
September 11, 2002, 9am PDT
The proposed plans for the redevelopment of Ground Zero demonstrate how little has changed in the last year, writes Martin Filler.
The New Republic
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