New Scientist

July 27, 2016, 6am PDT
New research in mice finds that the brain has two levels of memory connected to place—one for the task of creating mental maps, and another for recalling locations of emotional significance.
New Scientist
May 6, 2015, 9am PDT
Animals are more than just guests or co-habitants in our cities, according to an article in New Scientist—they're a critical component of the infrastructure that keeps cities running.
New Scientist
June 10, 2012, 1pm PDT
Jacob Aron reports on the promising new software developed by an international group of researchers that can recognize "what makes Paris look like Paris."
New Scientist
August 18, 2011, 8am PDT
Driving is down in the U.S. and countries all over the world, according to a variety of studies. This piece from <em>New Scientist</em> looks into why the road is less traveled.
New Scientist
August 3, 2010, 1pm PDT
Cities make more sounds than just cars driving by or factories humming. Trevor Cox says we should embrace the subtle sounds of cities, and update our urban design to make sure we can.
New Scientist
February 23, 2010, 8am PST
As architects and planners seek to create sustainable buildings and cities, some scientists suggest looking at the intricate home-building of insects.
New Scientist
August 6, 2009, 2pm PDT
A century ago there were plans to supplant much of Manhattan's metro system with subterranean moving walkways. This article looks at the history.
New Scientist
July 29, 2009, 8am PDT
Water projects and diversion efforts in Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria are draining the marshlands near the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, known as the 'Fertile Crescent'.
New Scientist
May 8, 2009, 10am PDT
Testing is underway in the U.K. on 'Anaconda', a giant rubber 'snake' that converts tidal wave energy to electricity. A full-sized Anaconda could reportedly power 1,000 homes.
New Scientist
March 27, 2009, 11am PDT
A new study has shown that city dwellers are less of a burden on the environment than those outside of city and metropolitan areas.
New Scientist
October 26, 2008, 7am PDT
UNESCO has released a detailed map of the world's aquifers, a move the organization hopes will enable more intelligent use of natural resources.
New Scientist
April 29, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>Think a city's road network is a result of rational planning? Well, think again. After analyzing over 300 cities -- both old and new -- scientists have discovered that cities tend to grow like organisms, and follow a similar mathematical pattern.</p>
New Scientist
March 6, 2008, 7am PST
<p>Researchers in Japan have created a live model of the so-called "shockwave" theory to explain traffic congestion.</p>
New Scientist
February 19, 2008, 12pm PST
<p>Scientists are proposing a plan to buffer the Gulf Coast from the brunt of hurricanes by engineering more than 1000 square kilometers of new wetlands along the coast.</p>
New Scientist
August 31, 2007, 11am PDT
<p>New archaeological findings suggest that ancient Mesopotamian cities did not develop by spreading outward from a central point, but rather by clustering nearby villages into larger cities.</p>
New Scientist
August 20, 2007, 8am PDT
<p>The Army Corps of Engineers is testing the pumps on an isolated section of a canal in New Orleans to see if water can be pumped from the canal to nearby Lake Pontchartrain faster -- a development that could minimize flooding during future hurricanes.</p>
New Scientist
August 19, 2007, 5am PDT
<p>Mining has expanded around many of the country's national parks, causing concern that the legal extraction of natural and hazardous materials is harming the protected ecosystems.</p>
New Scientist
July 3, 2007, 5am PDT
<p>A new report from the United Nations Population Fund argues that cities should be planning ahead to handle the expected population boom in urban areas.</p>
New Scientist
May 16, 2007, 8am PDT
<p>A new study has shown that increasing urban park space can have a significant effect on reducing city temperatures -- a strategy that could be used to mitigate the temperature increase caused by climate change.</p>
New Scientist
May 16, 2006, 8am PDT
The WorldMapper takes cartography and demographics to a whole new level -- these cartograms make stats from international immigration, to tourism and population, sexy.
New Scientist