New Scientist

Jacob Aron reports on the promising new software developed by an international group of researchers that can recognize "what makes Paris look like Paris."
Jun 10, 2012   New Scientist
Driving is down in the U.S. and countries all over the world, according to a variety of studies. This piece from <em>New Scientist</em> looks into why the road is less traveled.
Aug 18, 2011   New Scientist
Cities make more sounds than just cars driving by or factories humming. Trevor Cox says we should embrace the subtle sounds of cities, and update our urban design to make sure we can.
Aug 3, 2010   New Scientist
As architects and planners seek to create sustainable buildings and cities, some scientists suggest looking at the intricate home-building of insects.
Feb 23, 2010   New Scientist
A century ago there were plans to supplant much of Manhattan's metro system with subterranean moving walkways. This article looks at the history.
Aug 6, 2009   New Scientist
Water projects and diversion efforts in Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria are draining the marshlands near the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, known as the 'Fertile Crescent'.
Jul 29, 2009   New Scientist
Testing is underway in the U.K. on 'Anaconda', a giant rubber 'snake' that converts tidal wave energy to electricity. A full-sized Anaconda could reportedly power 1,000 homes.
May 8, 2009   New Scientist
A new study has shown that city dwellers are less of a burden on the environment than those outside of city and metropolitan areas.
Mar 27, 2009   New Scientist
UNESCO has released a detailed map of the world's aquifers, a move the organization hopes will enable more intelligent use of natural resources.
Oct 26, 2008   New Scientist
<p>Think a city's road network is a result of rational planning? Well, think again. After analyzing over 300 cities -- both old and new -- scientists have discovered that cities tend to grow like organisms, and follow a similar mathematical pattern.</p>
Apr 29, 2008   New Scientist
<p>Researchers in Japan have created a live model of the so-called "shockwave" theory to explain traffic congestion.</p>
Mar 6, 2008   New Scientist