Slate

A recent article presents the findings of a study examining the question of how humans will assign or cope with blame for collisions caused by self-driving cars. The findings present insight on how humans will interact with technology in the future.
May 15, 2014   Slate
Slate's Fred Kaplan points out that the Times Square bomber was thwarted because of Jacob's famous "eyes on the street."
May 10, 2010   Slate
Witold Rybczynski says that people have lost their faith in city-driven urban planning, and that the private marketplace is driving the changes we need today.
Apr 5, 2010   Slate
Slate continues its series on wayfinding with the little-known story of the symbolic conflicts among the U.S., the former Soviet Union and Japan over how to direct people in a time of crisis.
Mar 10, 2010   Slate
This slideshow from <em>Slate</em> explores some of the strangest maps in history.
Dec 7, 2009   Slate
Witold Rybczynski profiles Christopher Alexander, author of A Pattern Language, one of the most influential books in urban planning. Alexander recently won the Vincent Scully prize from the National Building Museum.
Dec 3, 2009   Slate
Because of the abundance of social interaction and diverse clientele, subways have long been the sites of sociological experiments to understand human behavior.
Nov 25, 2009   Slate
Over the past 15 years, more than 76,000 pedestrians have been killed in the U.S. Some say preventing a significant portion of these deaths is as simple as enforcing jaywalking laws. Not so, argues Tom Vanderbilt, author of <em>Traffic</em>.
Nov 15, 2009   Slate
How can a Porsche be better for the environment than a Prius? If you use transit to commute, and only take the hot rod out on the weekends. Slate writer Joe Eaton sold his Volvo for a combination of transit and fun.
Oct 30, 2009   Slate
Photographer Camilo Jose Vergara's pictures document Harlem's journey from a "rundown version of Paris" in the 1970s to the "global Harlem" of luxury condos and corporate franchises [includes slideshow].
Jun 15, 2009   Slate
In an age of rapid technological improvements in almost every aspect of life, it's difficult to understand how a technology like trains could actually be less advanced now than it was in the 1940s, writes Tom Vanderbilt.
May 16, 2009   Slate