Slate

Most cities in the United States tax land according to what an owner builds on it. That's great if you're an owner, but lousy if you're a city that wants something cool built on it. The solution: tax it according to what an owner can build on it.
May 26, 2015   Slate
The "utopian" cities being built from scratch in Asia to accommodate its fantastic rate of urbanization are striving to be smarter and greener, but may also be financially risky.
Nov 28, 2011   Slate
In this piece, Greg Lindsay take a cautiously optimistic stance on whether or not from-scratch Asian cities are the way to address urban overpopulation.
Nov 26, 2011   Slate
While some may be disappointed by how cities aren't yet swarming with robots and automated cars, Frank Swain writes that it's a matter of when we humans can tailor our landscapes to enable the new technology.
Oct 13, 2011   Slate
The FHWA says that 40% of all traffic accidents happen at intersections, and many of those are caused by left turns. A new type of intersection called the "diverging diamond" takes left turns out of the picture.
Oct 12, 2011   Slate
<em>Slate</em> looks at the work and vast urban transformations brought about under the leadership of New York City Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan.
Aug 17, 2011   Slate
Witold Rybczynski writes the epitaph for the McMansion. With the housing market in the toilet, Rybczynski says new homebuyers are going to be seeking something smaller, more affordable and possibly not a single-family home.
May 12, 2011   Slate
Slate looks at America's long history of dreaming up grand stadiums that end up unbuilt, from a waterfront stadium on Manhattan's West Side to a floating stadium in Puget Sound.
Mar 16, 2011   Slate
Streetcars -- a relatively old transportation technology -- have more traction than high tech solutions like monorails in the modern age of mobility. Want proof? Just look at Disneyland, says Tom Vanderbilt.
Jan 15, 2011   Slate
In an experiment in social data gathering, Slate's Michael Agger suggests that there is a host of ways we could be contributing our personal data to help make better policy decisions.
Dec 6, 2010   Slate
I.M. Pei, Robert A.M. Stern, Daniel Libeskind, Louis Kahn, Frank Gehry - all of these architects were height-challenged. Witold Rybczynski writes in Slate about why great architects are usually short and what that means for the built environment.
Dec 4, 2010   Slate