Slate

March 10, 2013, 5am PDT
AAA has been outspoken in their opposition to the parking reforms being debated in Washington D.C. For Matthew Iglesias, parking is a "privilege," not a right.
Slate
February 13, 2013, 10am PST
While holding out promise for oil industry advocates, shale oil extraction in the United States appears to obey the law of diminishing returns.
Slate
February 5, 2013, 2pm PST
The Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) is out with its annual Urban Mobility Report. You'll probably hear a lot in the next day about how awful your city's traffic is. But you likely won't hear much about why that might not be so bad.
Slate
November 20, 2012, 6am PST
You've probably heard of the improbable lengths to which Tokyo's subway goes to pack in riders. But you likely haven't seen images of "unwilling subjects trapped in the train window" like those taken by photographer Michael Wolf.
Slate
October 23, 2012, 12pm PDT
Although "two of the hottest buzzwords in urban planning" - resilience and sustainability - are often used interchangeably, in many cases they actually work against each other. David Biello examines why both are crucial for the future of our cities.
Slate
October 11, 2012, 6am PDT
Matthew Yglesias diagnoses a common predicament facing many urban communities: the fear that improving living conditions is a <em>bad</em> thing.
Slate
April 18, 2012, 7am PDT
Will Oremus investigates an occurrence he noticed recently in Tom Vanderbilt's series on walking – that the cities with the highest "walk scores" were all liberal – and asks why conservative cities don't walk.
Slate
April 14, 2012, 11am PDT
For the third installment of his series on America's pedestrian problem, Tom Vanderbilt profiles Walk Score, the venerable walkability website and evaluation system.
Slate
April 13, 2012, 10am PDT
In the second part of a four part series on America's pedestrian problem, Tom Vanderbilt evaluates the surprisingly formalized field of pedestrian behavior research, from navigating crowded sidewalks to tripping at the bottom of the stairs.
Slate
March 27, 2012, 2pm PDT
Esther Dyson looks at the reasons why cities endure, why they are the right setting for massive social change, and how we can improve them through competition and intelligent design.
Slate
March 4, 2012, 11am PST
With the consistent news about declining home values and stagnating sales, its easy to forget that, in effect, there are two housing markets in the U.S. - those for owners and those for renters. Guess which one is booming.
Slate
February 28, 2012, 9am PST
In one of the countries leading the world in green energy adoption, a program to support solar energy has become a victim of its own success, reports Bjørn Lomborg.
Slate
January 21, 2012, 9am PST
What is more likely to constitute a successful transit system -- one that runs dirty old vehicles at shorter headways or one that runs beautiful comfortable vehicles less frequently? Tom Vanderbilt wades into the public conversation in <em>Slate</em>
Slate
January 8, 2012, 11am PST
Mapmaker David Imus spent 2 years creating the best 3x4-foot paper wall map you'll ever see.
Slate
December 9, 2011, 10am PST
Between the Obama Administration's patchwork approach to funding and outright Republican opposition, high speed rail appears to be dead.
Slate
November 28, 2011, 8am PST
The "utopian" cities being built from scratch in Asia to accommodate its fantastic rate of urbanization are striving to be smarter and greener, but may also be financially risky.
Slate
November 26, 2011, 1pm PST
In this piece, Greg Lindsay take a cautiously optimistic stance on whether or not from-scratch Asian cities are the way to address urban overpopulation.
Slate
October 13, 2011, 6am PDT
While some may be disappointed by how cities aren't yet swarming with robots and automated cars, Frank Swain writes that it's a matter of when we humans can tailor our landscapes to enable the new technology.
Slate
October 12, 2011, 12pm PDT
The FHWA says that 40% of all traffic accidents happen at intersections, and many of those are caused by left turns. A new type of intersection called the "diverging diamond" takes left turns out of the picture.
Slate
August 17, 2011, 1pm PDT
<em>Slate</em> looks at the work and vast urban transformations brought about under the leadership of New York City Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan.
Slate