The Economist

A new exhibit at MoMA celebrates the "fitfully idealistic" architecture of Latin America, 1955 through 1980. Broad in scope, the exhibition ranges from Brasília's bold utopianism to the community-focused tactics of Bo Bardi.
Yesterday   The Economist
The Economist reports that the collapse of Detroit's auto industry has had a ripple effect up north, particularly in Windsor, Ontario.
Aug 5, 2009   The Economist
The Economist looks at the looming battle between Congress and the Administration over whether to proceed now on transportation reauthorization or delay it 18 months, and concludes that the bottom line will be the funding mechanism.
Jul 6, 2009   The Economist
The Maldives has pledged to be entirely carbon-neutral by 2020. The president has hired a team of environmentalists to put the pledge into action.
Mar 24, 2009   The Economist
Flashy plans to build a green city on an island near Shanghai have yet to take any shape. The Chinese government claims the project is still on its way.
Mar 21, 2009   The Economist
This piece from <em>The Economist</em> looks at human-caused waste, how different economies generate it differently, and how they deal with it.
Mar 12, 2009   The Economist
A new plan is taking form in Brazil to regularize titles to rainforest land -- an effort the government hopes will fight deforestation.
Feb 28, 2009   The Economist
The controversial theory that social and physical disorder is a cause of neighborhood crime has been successfully demonstrated with a series of six experiments.
Nov 27, 2008   The Economist
<p>As foreclosures increase throughout the country, more cities are looking to solve the problem of abandoned and dilapidated houses with demolition.</p>
Jul 16, 2008   The Economist
<p>The Economist reviews the state of America's crumbling civil infrastructure. With water, transit, bridge, and road systems failing, experts call for increased investment and careful planning.</p>
Jun 30, 2008   The Economist
<p>Most developers dread finding archaeological remains. Normally it means months of delays and increased costs while archaeologists investigate the site. However, some savvy developers are turning archaeological finds into a marketing advantage.</p>
Jun 10, 2008   The Economist