Urban Fold

Vision Zero

The mayor of Los Angeles followed the lead of cities like New York and San Francisco in setting Vision Zero targets for traffic fatalities by the year 2025. The question remains: Will it be done?
6 days ago   LA Streetsblog
Private autos will have restricted access to a congested stretch of downtown San Francisco's main drag, Market Street, beginning August 11, in an attempt to make the street safer for non-motorists.
Aug 11, 2015   San Francisco Chronicle
A new Transit Center report shows what it takes to enact change.
Aug 3, 2015   Next City
Motor vehicle crashes claim over 30,000 lives per year, with related costs in the hundreds of billions. While we sometimes view that frightening statistic as inevitable, there are reasons to reexamine speed limits and how we set them.
Aug 2, 2015   Five Thirty Eight
New York City and San Jose have expanded or added rules that temporarily close some of their streets to automobile traffic. This continues a string of successes for the open streets movement.
Jul 15, 2015   Next City
A simple, innovative idea behind Seattle's Vision Zero initiative: good driving behavior should generate more positive outcomes.
Jun 23, 2015   CityLab
A June 16 vote by the San Francisco MTA to improve safety will allow taxis, along with bicycles and Muni buses, but not ride-hailing services to make turns onto the downtown's main thoroughfare, Market Street, has upset San Francisco-based Uber.
Jun 18, 2015   San Francisco Chronicle
The Safer Market Street project is one of a package of traffic safety projects underway in San Francisco to achieve a Vision Zero goal to eliminate traffic deaths by 2024.
Jun 12, 2015   SFGate
Although Los Angeles isn't famous for its walking culture, many neighborhoods are actually quite suited for it. That is, if streets could be made friendlier to the pedestrians they currently repel.
Jun 5, 2015   Los Angeles Times
Active Transportation Alliance, a Chicago pedestrian advocacy group, urges Mayor Rahm Emanuel to improve red light cameras rather than remove them. Despite complaints from drivers, well-advertised cameras can reduce pedestrian fatalities.
May 29, 2015   Chi.Streetsblog
The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency voted 6-0 on March 3 to approve a controversial plan to redesign 1.3 miles of Polk Street, one of the most dangerous corridors for biking and walking in The City. It only took 2.5 years.
Mar 5, 2015   The San Francisco Examiner