Fast Company

April 4, 2012, 11am PDT
From black flight to Asian invasion, Mark Wilson offers his take on a stunning map that lays out the changing demography of Los Angeles.
Fast Company
March 3, 2012, 5am PST
In an interview with the British inventor James Dyson, Ben Schiller discusses the future of engineering and design in America and the fallacies behind much "green" design.
Fast Company
February 17, 2012, 9am PST
Eric Laine and Suzanne Steelman present LiveWork, a new take on the changing nature of living and working in a design for a mixed use development in Athens, GA.
Fast Company
February 2, 2012, 6am PST
According to Alain de Botton, religion shouldn't get to claim the most beautiful buildings, so he proposes a temple for anything else "positive and good," right in the center of London.
Fast Company
December 11, 2011, 9am PST
William Bostwick explores how locally-sourced, niche product manufacturing could help the Rust Belt rise.
Fast Company
December 6, 2011, 2pm PST
The EPA estimates the U.S. has $13 billion in wastewater infrastructure. Fast Company explains how innovations in wastewater management using natural processes will change everything.
Fast Company
November 4, 2011, 10am PDT
A startup is proposing a new way to incentivize alternative transportation choices by giving people the option each day to choose between cars, bikes and transit.
Fast Company
October 20, 2011, 2pm PDT
Ariel Schwartz writes that California is poised to make a significant leap into Gov 2.0, with Apps for reporting graffiti and potholes, crowdsourcing solutions to local issues, and more.
Fast Company
October 17, 2011, 7am PDT
How is the City of London incentivizing bike and ped commuters for helping improve the air? There's an App for that.
Fast Company
October 15, 2011, 1pm PDT
Carl F. Meyer of Perkins+Will presents three things he strives for to make vibrant public spaces, and all three involve mixing it up.
Fast Company
October 6, 2011, 5am PDT
Atlanta's BeltLine is a great example of a big "catalyst project," writes Ryan Gravel, which repurposes a 22-mile railroad into a linear park. Other cities can follow suit.
Fast Company
September 30, 2011, 6am PDT
Recent winner of the Solar Decathlon's affordability category, the Empowerhouse costs under $230,000 to construct and uses an estimated 90% less energy than the typical U.S. home.
Fast Company
September 23, 2011, 6am PDT
Part of this week's Urban Design Week in New York City, design duo Original Champions of Design present three solutions to a weak wayfinding system currently in place in the city's subways.
Fast Company
September 8, 2011, 9am PDT
M.I.T. has developed a new open-source ArcGIS toolbox that they say will illustrate how a cities' spatial layout affects the way people will live in it.
Fast Company
September 7, 2011, 7am PDT
In the aftermath of Hurricane Irene, Fast Company's Boyd Cohen writes how New York City's preparedness for Hurricane's should include enhancing infrastructure in things like the Internet and transit.
Fast Company
August 29, 2011, 6am PDT
The village of Shamen, China lacks running water, and scarcity has created a lack of awareness of water health issues. A complex new bathhouse aims to curb health problems and create a gathering place in the process.
Fast Company
August 19, 2011, 5am PDT
Burning Man -- the annual arts festival and self-reliance experiment -- is more than a party in the desert. Its organizers are starting a new effort to revitalize the neighborhood around their San Francisco office.
Fast Company
August 12, 2011, 6am PDT
A new program is being implemented in Portland, Oregon, to try to quantify and model the behavior of the city.
Fast Company
July 18, 2011, 5am PDT
An Australian study indicates that in large cities in Europe, North America and Australia, driving has 'peaked' largely due to congestion causing a limit to commuter's travel, known as the Marchetti wall.
Fast Company
July 7, 2011, 1pm PDT
A post at <em>Fast Company</em> describes the House in the Outskirts of Brussels as business in front and a party in back. (SEE IMAGES).
Fast Company