National Geographic

A researcher from the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University explains how to use interactive maps to track climate change.
Aug 15, 2015   National Geographic
Carbon dioxide is one of the most widespread greenhouse gases produced by humans. Trees can absorb it, but release it when they die. Scientists are looking to build artificial trees to do the job permanently.
Aug 5, 2010   National Geographic
A new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council shows that many parts of the Great Plains and the Southwest U.S. are facing severe water shortages in the near future.
Jul 28, 2010   National Geographic
This article from <em>National Geographic</em> examines the rapidly depleted Jordan River and how saving it could bring Israel and its quarreling neighbors together.
Mar 23, 2010   National Geographic
This piece from <em>National Geographic</em> takes a look at the three-year drought that's plaguing California's cities and farms.
Mar 18, 2010   National Geographic
Small-scale nuclear reactors could be a new, cheap way to provide power for neighborhoods. But their inherent controversy remains.
Feb 20, 2010   National Geographic
The Sahara desert is becoming increasingly green, according to satellite imagery -- which scientists are attributing to rising temperatures associated with global climate change.
Aug 4, 2009   National Geographic
The Seasteading Institute, a group that advocates creating sovereign nations in international waters, announces the winner of their seastead design contest.
May 26, 2009   National Geographic
Advances in material development have brought to the market a new type of concrete that can bend under pressure and heal cracks with the addition of water.
May 7, 2009   National Geographic
This piece from <em>National Geographic</em> looks at how green roofs are sweeping across the tops of buildings all over the world.
Apr 21, 2009   National Geographic
Anthropologists have discovered traces of highly organized and gridded cities in the Amazon rainforest dating back to the 1200s.
Aug 31, 2008   National Geographic