National Geographic

Here's a comeback story for the ages: The Elwha River in Washington, dammed for the production of hydroelectric power for almost a century, runs wild again.
Aug 29, 2014   National Geographic
The small town of Perugia, Italy has left its traffic worries behind by implementing various driving restrictions and transportation solutions like escalators and a "minimetro".
Feb 3, 2011   National Geographic
Beneath Paris is an underground network of tunnels and quarries, long closed to the public. <em>National Geographic</em> takes a tour of this forbidden part of the city, where urban explorers keep tradition alive.
Feb 3, 2011   National Geographic
National Geographic tackles the controversial issue of population growth, and the sustainability of a growing population. Should we worry about maxing out the planet? Not necessarily, according to Nat. Geo.
Jan 3, 2011   National Geographic
The federal government set aside $5.5 billion in stimulus funding to retrofit its huge fleet of buildings. $4.5 billion is to be spent on green building projects, some of which have already been launched.
Dec 28, 2010   National Geographic
Carbon dioxide is one of the most widespread greenhouse gases produced by humans. Trees can absorb it, but release it when they die. Scientists are looking to build artificial trees to do the job permanently.
Aug 5, 2010   National Geographic
A new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council shows that many parts of the Great Plains and the Southwest U.S. are facing severe water shortages in the near future.
Jul 28, 2010   National Geographic
This article from <em>National Geographic</em> examines the rapidly depleted Jordan River and how saving it could bring Israel and its quarreling neighbors together.
Mar 23, 2010   National Geographic
This piece from <em>National Geographic</em> takes a look at the three-year drought that's plaguing California's cities and farms.
Mar 18, 2010   National Geographic
Small-scale nuclear reactors could be a new, cheap way to provide power for neighborhoods. But their inherent controversy remains.
Feb 20, 2010   National Geographic
The Sahara desert is becoming increasingly green, according to satellite imagery -- which scientists are attributing to rising temperatures associated with global climate change.
Aug 4, 2009   National Geographic