Newsweek

April 12, 2014, 5am PDT
To create more active and economically healthy downtowns, cities are seeking development on parking lots.
Newsweek
August 17, 2013, 7am PDT
Andrew Romano explores the ironic fate of the modest mid-century home in the cradle of modernist residential design, where a hot housing market imperils their existence.
Newsweek
March 3, 2011, 2pm PST
Writing for <em>Newsweek</em>, George Will claims that the real reason that progressives are gung ho for high-speed rail is because it suppresses the individualism of Americans and makes them more subservient to government.
Newsweek
February 21, 2011, 9am PST
Scotia, California may be the nation's last remaining company town. The entire city could be headed to market this year.
Newsweek
November 3, 2010, 12pm PDT
High Speed Rail, regardless of how glamorous it appears to be, is nothing but a waste of money in the U.S., claims Robert Samuelson. If states want HSR, let them build it themselves without federal subsidy, he concludes as there is no national gain.
Newsweek
July 22, 2010, 2pm PDT
<em>Newsweek</em> picks the brains of architects to offer these visions of what the cities of New York and Los Angeles will look like in 2030.
Newsweek
November 19, 2009, 8am PST
SketchUp isn't just for urban designers- it turns out that it makes perfect sense to autistic children, giving them a tool that taps their skill at visual communication.
Newsweek
October 27, 2009, 2pm PDT
Extensive investments in rail are slashing travel times in China, and creating a vastly more connected and accessible country.
Newsweek
October 13, 2009, 2pm PDT
Joel Kotkin sees a trend in a 'New Localism'- people aren't moving around like they used to, and it's causing them to reengage with their communities.
Newsweek
May 20, 2009, 8am PDT
George Will, fresh from denouncing denim as 'the infantile uniform of a nation', is disturbed to find that Ray LaHood has bought the Obama administration's beliefs in regards to mass transit, bicycling, and 'transformation'.
Newsweek
April 30, 2009, 11am PDT
David McCullough's <em>Newsweek</em> essay ponders the negative effects of a proposed development on the majestic Brooklyn Bridge's image.
Newsweek
March 26, 2009, 4am PDT
While the number of private sector jobs shrinks, places with higher proportions of government workers are doing quite well. It's estimated that public servants will see wage increases of 2% or more this year.
Newsweek
January 28, 2009, 7am PST
When a Somali population moved into a dying city in Maine, the benefits of the "new injection of energy" they brought with them has been clear ever since--particularly eonomic growth.
Newsweek
January 22, 2009, 10am PST
The line between suburb and city blurs as suburbs struggle with the problems of the cities' past. But there's hope, say this article's authors, who make a case for regionalism and government's active role in reinventing such struggling places.
Newsweek
January 8, 2009, 12pm PST
As they currently lead the way in designing the most avant-garde projects for overseas clients, American architecture firms must understand the roots of their success to stay afloat .
Newsweek
December 19, 2008, 1pm PST
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger writes that the failure of the U.S. to invest in infrastructure is hurting the economy, and a massive investment is necessary.
Newsweek
November 17, 2008, 1pm PST
Fewer and fewer malls are being built in the U.S., and as they fade from the American landscape, retailers feel the pain.
Newsweek
October 9, 2008, 12pm PDT
Upon gaining the presidency, Senator McCain would make the federal government spend part of its bailout money on bad home mortgages, allowing homeowners to stay put and make payments that reflect their homes' lessened values.
Newsweek
October 2, 2008, 6am PDT
For the fourth time, the unincorporated area of East Los Angeles is making efforts to become a city. This article examines its colorful history and what East L.A. hopes to accomplish in gaining cityhood.
Newsweek
September 19, 2008, 11am PDT
Cathleen McGuigan, Newsweek's architecture critic, is disdainful of the hype surrounding green architecture, particularly because it so often doesn't address the main problems with land use: proximity to jobs and services, and oversized development.
Newsweek