Michael Sivak

New figures from the Federal Highway Administration show no abatement in increasing vehicle miles traveled (VMT). While low oil prices have been beneficial for the environment on the production end, it is wreaking havoc on the consumption side.
Nov 8, 2015   AASHTO Journal
The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute released its eighth report on peak motorization in the U.S., an evaluation of time spent traveling for a broad category of purposes, not just work. From 2004 to 2014, total time decreased.
Sep 2, 2015   The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute
According to the Census Bureau's American Community Survey on commuting to work, one subregion in the Bay Area can claim accolades for having achieved the largest drop in solo-commuting from 2006, scoring the third lowest drive-alone rate in 2013.
Aug 17, 2015   The Sacramento Bee - Capitol Alert
The effect of low gas prices on motor vehicle selection by consumers could set back President Barack Obama's climate legacy, which includes obtaining fuel economy standards of 54.5 mpg by 2025.
Dec 31, 2014   The Wall Street Journal
Is there a relationship between carless households and density of college graduates? Derek Thompson of The Atlantic connected the dots using Michael Sivak's latest 'peak car' study and saw a relationship between the two variables.
Jan 29, 2014   The Atlantic
Last year, the U.S. increased oil consumption by two percent, surpassing the increase in China for the first time in more than a decade according to a new IEA report. How does this increase square with peak car, peak VMT, and peak oil consumption?
Jan 25, 2014   Marketplace
Michael Sivak of the Univ. of Michigan has published another key report documenting our waning love affair with the automobile. Sivak documents peak overall gasoline consumption occurring in 2004. Per capita fuel consumption may have peaked in 2003.
Nov 24, 2013   Scientific American
As a nation, we are driving less, but we are increasingly stuck in traffic. What explains this paradox? Using Portland as an example, where driving peaked in 2004, Joseph Rose attempts to explain with lots of help from transportation experts.
Sep 20, 2013   The Oregonian