American Cities

6 days ago
How much do we have to fear from the president-elect's policy plans for urban America? We can hope that he will follow his party's playbook and largely ignore the cities, but potential changes to housing policy are more serious.
Shelterforce/Rooflines
August 16, 2016, 6am PDT
Cities have appeared to figure very little into the presidential election up to now. To get a sense of whether this impression is accurate, I spent some time looking at the two party platforms, and the two candidate's websites.
Shelterforce/Rooflines
Blog post
July 13, 2016, 8am PDT
Planners across the globe have been exploring opportunities to use augmented reality to enhance the way the public engages with the city. Over the last few days Pokémon Go took off, and now people are wandering across cities to catch Pokémon.
Jennifer Evans-Cowley
June 24, 2016, 7am PDT
The in-migration of Millennials is largely driving the changes that American cities are going through. More specifically, it is the ones with college degrees who are driving the change. Where are they moving, and what is their effect?
Shelterforce/Rooflines
June 22, 2016, 6am PDT
Exploding global population numbers and worries about escalating energy prices, climate change, and energy independence have placed a priority on net-zero building. This article explores the viability of net-zero communities and cities.
Blue & Green Tomorrow
July 11, 2015, 5am PDT
A simple demonstration of one of the benefits of density.
Architect This City
Blog post
June 1, 2015, 12pm PDT
Recent stories claiming that millenials either (a) prefer cities to suburbs or (b) prefer suburbs to cities both have some basis in reality.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
February 2, 2015, 10am PST
Governing's recent study of gentrification systematically exaggerates gentrification in a variety of ways.
Michael Lewyn
October 6, 2014, 7am PDT
"Who's Moving to the Cities, Who Isn't" suggest that the number of Americans selling the "Golden Age" cities narrative is greater than the number of Americans buying into it.
Center for Community Progress
Blog post
March 1, 2014, 7pm PST
Discussing some of the most pro-urban movies ever made.
Michael Lewyn
February 24, 2014, 2pm PST
An intrepid Reddit user has produced a striking visualization for the economic importance of the country’s urban areas by splitting the nation’s GDP into two—the top 50 percent and the lower 50 percent.
The Washington Post - The Fix
February 24, 2014, 11am PST
A new report by Brookings confirms that “big cities remain more unequal places by income than the rest of the country.” Where is the gap between wealth and poverty the greatest?
Brookings
November 4, 2013, 11am PST
Chuck Wolfe comments on this week's mayoral election in Seattle, suggesting the pending populist model for New York City is already on display.
myurbanist
August 18, 2013, 5am PDT
Famed Danish architect Jan Gehl shared his thoughts this week about people-friendly cities, and why we have no option but to build them.
Future Cities
October 5, 2011, 11am PDT
While many stories have been written about Detroit's turnaround, it took the top spot on Forbes list of most dangerous cities. Detroit had 1,111 violent crimes reported per 100,000 residents, which included 345 murders, writes John Giuffo.
Forbes
August 3, 2011, 2pm PDT
Frank Gruber asks, "why, not how." Many of the explanations for decline are clear; why it was allowed to happen, less so. Gruber highlights "suspects" of what might have led to cities' destruction.
The Huffington Post
June 22, 2011, 1pm PDT
Predictable cities like San Francisco, Seattle, and Portland are in the Top 10, but cities like San Diego and San Jose also hold prominent spots on the list.
Triple Pundit
Blog post
July 17, 2007, 10pm PDT

WROCLAW, Poland--I have been swanning about Eastern Europe for the better part of two months, wandering the streets of cities large and small, famous and obscure. As should be apparent to anyone short of Toby Keith or James Inhofe, even the most undistinguished European city could teach any American city a thing or two about charm, walkability, and gracious living.

Josh Stephens
Blog post
April 23, 2007, 7pm PDT

It's been a great week for city planning here on the East Coast. The American Planning Association's 99th National Conference held in Philadelphia drew more than 6,000 attendees, a fact noticed by Philadelphia Inquirer writer Inga Saffron in her April 13th column titled "Welcome, Welcome City Planners," where she took the opportunity to draw local and national lessons from the event. The APA opened with Robert Kennedy's address on environmental planning and closed with an exploration of the legacy of Edmund Bacon (Philadelphia's director of city planning from 1949-1970), but more about that later.

Eugenie Birch
Blog post
April 3, 2007, 1pm PDT

Here's an item that should be more than enough to make you spew your morning latte all over the Starbucks:

In a survey, conducted last year and released yesterday by Mercer Consulting, ranking the top 50 global cities by quality of life, not a single American city cracks the top half. Zero.

Josh Stephens