China

July 16, 2010, 1pm PDT
A $10 billion dollar spending spree will improve transit in Cordoba and Buenos Aires, but also between Argentina and neighboring Bolivia. "Funds come from the China Development Bank and will require a 15% match from the Argentinian government."
the transport politic
July 7, 2010, 2pm PDT
A decade after its inception, Shanghai's One City, Nine Towns project, an ambitious attempt to manage the city's massive population growth via the creation of international-themed satellite communities, has failed to deliver hoped-for results.
Assembly
June 30, 2010, 2pm PDT
By 2030, China will have 220 cities containing a population of 1 million or more, 24 of which will be megacities. The boom China is expected to go through, 'boggles the imagination of North Americans and Europeans.'
World Changing
June 3, 2010, 10am PDT
Cisco is contributing technology to Songdo City in South Korea, a brand new and complete city for a million people. China plans to build hundreds of these "cities-in-a-box" as a massive rural-to-urban migration occurs there.
San Jose Mercury News
May 19, 2010, 12pm PDT
China has plans not only to expand its own network of high speed trains, but to build the trains for the rest of the world. They are already giving Japan and Europe a run for their money. Not bad considering their first HSR line opened in 2008.
The Washington Post
May 16, 2010, 5am PDT
A new report predicts that more than 50% of China's population will live in cities by 2020.
People's Daily Online
Blog post
May 3, 2010, 6am PDT

I’ve spent much of the last three years working on transportation finance and planning issues in China, and Reason Foundation now has transportation policy projects up and running in the cities of Chongqing, Xi’an, and Beijing.

Samuel Staley
January 11, 2010, 6am PST
In a new working paper called “The Greenness of China: Household Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development,” Siqi Zheng, Rui Wang, Edward L. Glaeser, and Matthew E. Kahn rank 74 Chinese cities in terms of their household carbon footprints.
NYTimes
January 9, 2010, 11am PST
As China's cities grow, the economic policy that determines who is a rural resident and who is an urban resident are in need of some changes, according to this article.
Guardian
Blog post
September 13, 2009, 7pm PDT

 This interview below with the Chinese Premier offers  a preview of the challenges and opportunities that will unfold at the

December 2009 UN Climate Conference  (see http://en.cop15.dk/?gclid=CI-ImOyB8JwCFYwwpAodNSUfjQ)

Here is the interview,  http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2009-09/14/content_8687301.htm

Matthew E. Kahn
Blog post
September 13, 2009, 4am PDT

During my first week in China, I have spoken to dozens of people and toured all over Beijing. I even have a map listing the locations of all of the McDonalds in Beijing. Spatial theorists need to write down a model to explain how a uniform distribution of McDonalds is what we observe.

While I am quite happy to be here, this is not a low cost trip. The flight over was literally a pain in the neck. I'm in trouble with my wife

Matthew E. Kahn
Blog post
September 10, 2009, 1am PDT

In my first week here in Beijing, I have spoken to a number of scholars here about climate change.  A few observations;

 1.  China's scholars are thinking about climate change mitigation but I haven't met many talking about adaptation.

Matthew E. Kahn
June 5, 2009, 12pm PDT
The Obama administration is making a U.S.-China deal on climate change a centerpiece, according to The Guardian (UK).
THE DIRT
March 21, 2009, 1pm PDT
Flashy plans to build a green city on an island near Shanghai have yet to take any shape. The Chinese government claims the project is still on its way.
The Economist
January 19, 2009, 8am PST
The City of Shanghai has signed on to a proposal from the Walt Disney Company to build a Disneyland theme park in Mainland China.
China Daily
January 15, 2009, 9am PST
Due to consumers cutting back, the global market for recyclables has collapsed and even begun to cost some cities' recycling programs.
The Christian Science Monitor
November 11, 2008, 5am PST
As China embarks on the greatest rail-building investment since the U.S. built its transcontinental railroad, this article points to the urgent need to reform its state-controlled pricing system, both for freight and passengers, to make it effective.
Business Week
Blog post
October 28, 2008, 11am PDT

This morning I was reading through my daily dose of planning related blogs and dropped in on The Overhead Wire, Jeff Wood's excellent transit soapbox. One of Jeff's most recent posts links to an October 25th Reuters article announcing China's $272 billion dollar investment in new rail infrastructure. Yes, you read that correctly. 272 billion. Can't you see president Hu Jintao bringing his pinky to his lips, à la Dr. Evil?

Mike Lydon
Blog post
July 24, 2008, 8am PDT

The McKinsey Global Institute has just published a major report outlining four potential scenarios for urbanization in China.

The main thrust of the report is that China needs to focus less on growing its cities and more on making them efficient and productive. Given the massive levels of capital investment Chinese cities have seen over the last 20 years, it makes sense that the country's urban planners need to find ways to squeeze more capacity out of these systems. After all, as McKinsey projects, another 350 million people will need to be accommodated, some 250 million of them as rootless rural migrants.

Anthony Townsend
June 23, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>A new building by Rem Koolhaas in Beijing is part of a wave of modern construction that is changing the tightly-planned urban fabric of the Chinese capital.</p>
The New Yorker