Stormwater

Recent floods in Texas, especially prevalent in Houston, reflect a stormwater infrastructure that both worked as it's designed and is in need of improvements.
Jun 3, 2015   Houston Chronicle
The project converted a nine-acre parking lot into an ambitious urbanist community, which revitalized a nearby natural water channel, added high density housing, retail, and integrated a walkable design.
Jun 7, 2011   Grist
An increasing amount of architecture projects in the U.S. are taking regional concerns like water and energy production into consideration.
May 14, 2011   Architect
A new sewage plant has opened in New York that hopes to reduce the amount of sewage overflow when storms overwhelm the city's combined sewage and stormwater system.
May 14, 2011   The New York Times
This collection of city profiles looks at cities around the world that are making major improvements to the way they handle and provide water.
Mar 24, 2011   National Geographic
In a part of Staten Island largely developed before formal sewer systems were in place, the effort to address both logistics and environmental issues offers lessons for other urban areas.
Dec 9, 2010   Urban Omnibus
Andy Lipkis, the founder and president of TreePeople, an organization in Los Angeles that brings natural concepts into the "urban forest", details his 40 years of work proving the feasibility of projects such as the Elmer Avenue Project.
Dec 3, 2010   The Planning Report
Chicago is trying to position itself as one of the greenest cities in America, but longheld plans to upgrade the city's overburdened stormwater system highlight how far it has to go.
Nov 12, 2010   Green Source
A new test program to de-pave the city of Baltimore is turning the soil formerly covered by city school playgrounds. The project is aimed at reducing runoff.
Aug 24, 2010   The Balimore Sun
Mark Gold, president of Heal the Bay, says that the Los Angeles Regional Water Control Board is the least environmentally friendly board in decades.
Aug 8, 2010   The Planning Report
The city of Seattle is taking on a $500 million project to update its storm drains to reduce the amount of untreated sewage that overflows into waterways during storm events.
Jul 15, 2010   The Seattle Times